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Indexes to Anthologies

Index of First Lines

Nay but you, who do not love her
to
O you plant the pain in my heart with your wistful eyes


Nay but you, who do not love her (R. Browning, OBEV)
Nay, weep not, dearest, though the child be dead (J.G. Saxe, YBAV)
Near to the silver Trent (M. Drayton, OBEV)
Nearer and ever nearer (R. Nichols, MBP)
Never seek to tell thy love (W. Blake, OBEV)
Never weather-beaten sail more willing bent to shore (T. Campion, OBEV)
New doth the sun appear (W. Drummond, OBEV)
News from a foreign country came (T. Traherne, OBEV)
Nightingale, as soon as April bringeth (Sir P. Sidney, OBEV)
Nightingale has a lyre of gold (W.E. Henley, MBP)
Night is dark, and the winter winds (R.H. Stoddard, YBAV)
Night was black and drear (R.W. Gilder, YBAV)
Night was thick and hazy (C.E. Carryl, MAP)
No coward soul is mine (E. Brontë, OBEV)
Nobly, nobly Cape Saint Vincent to the North-west died away (R. Browning, OBEV)
Noe more unto my thoughts appeare (S. Godolphin, Meta)
No longer mourn for me when I am dead (W. Shakespeare, Gold)
No, no! go not to Lethe, neither twist (J. Keats, OBEV)
North and west along the coast among the misty islands (H.H. Knibbs, MAP)
Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note (C. Wolfe, Gold)
Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note (C. Wolfe, OBEV)
Not, Celia, that I juster am (Sir C. Sedley, Gold)
Not, Celia, that I juster am (Sir C. Sedley, OBEV)
Not from the whole wide world I chose thee (R.W. Gilder, YBAV)
Nothyng ys to man so dere (R. Mannyng, OBEV)
Not of the princes and prelates with periwigged charioteers (J. Masefield, MBP)
Not ours, say some, the thought of death to dread (W. Watson, OBEV)
Not that by this disdain (T. Stanley, Meta)
Not unto us, O Lord (H. Cust, OBEV)
Now, by the blessed Paphian queen (O.W. Holmes, YBAV)
Now for a brisk and cheerful fight(J.W. Palmer, YBAV)
Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white (A. Tennyson, OBEV)
Now the golden Morn aloft (T. Gray, Gold)
Now the last day of many days (P.B. Shelley, Gold)
Now the lusty spring is seen (J. Fletcher, OBEV)
Now the North wind ceases (G. Meredith, OBEV)
Now very quietly, and rather mournfully (J.C. Squire, MBP)
Now winter nights enlarge (T. Campion, OBEV)
Now you have freely given me leave to love (T. Carew, Meta)
Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room (W. Wordsworth, OBEV)

O blithe new-comer! I have heard (W. Wordsworth, Gold)
O Brignall banks are wild and fair (Sir W. Scott, Gold)
O brignall banks are wild and fair (Sir W. Scott, OBEV)
O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done (W. Whitman, OBEV)
O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done (W. Whitman, YBAV)
O Christ of God! whose life and death (J.G. Whittier, OBEV)
O City that is not a city, unworthy the prefix Atlantic (H.C. Bunner, YBAV)
O come, soft rest of cares! come, Night(G. Chapman, OBEV)
O days endeared to every Muse (J.R. Lowell, YBAV)
O earth, lie heavily upon her eyes (C.G. Rossetti, OBEV)
O fair and stately maid, whose eyes (R.W. Emerson, YBAV)
Of all the flowers rising now (W. Philpot, OBEV)
Of all the girls that are so smart (H. Carey, Gold)
Of all the girls that are so smart (H. Carey, OBEV)
Of all the torments, all the cares (W. Walsh, OBEV)
Of a' the airts the wind can blaw (R. Burns, Gold)
Of a' the airts the wind can blaw (R. Burns, OBEV)
O fly, my Soul! What hangs upon (J. Shirley, OBEV)
O fly not, Pleasure, pleasant-hearted Pleasure (W.S. Blunt, OBEV)
Of Nelson and the North (T. Campbell, Gold)
Of Nelson and the North (T. Campbell, OBEV)
Of Neptune's empire let us sing (T. Campion, OBEV)
Of on that is so fayr and bright (Anonymous, OBEV)
O for some honest lover's ghost (Sir J. Suckling, OBEV)
O for the mighty wakening that aroused (T. Wade, OBEV)
O frankly bald and obviously stout(O. Seaman, MBP)
O Friend! I know not which way I must look (W. Wordsworth, Gold)
O friend! I know not which way I must look (W. Wordsworth, OBEV)
Often I think of the beautiful town (H.W. Longfellow, OBEV)
Often I think of the beautiful town (H.W. Longfellow, YBAV)
Often when the night is come (E.R. Sill, YBAV)
Of thee (kind boy) I ask no red and white (Sir J. Suckling, Meta)
Of the old house, only a few crumbled (L. Binyon, MBP)
Of this fair volume which we World do name (W. Drummond, Gold)
Oft in the stilly night (T. Moore, Gold)
Oft, in the stilly night (T. Moore, OBEV)
O goddess! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung (J. Keats, OBEV)
O happy dames! that may embrace (H. Howard, OBEV)
O happy Tithon! if thou know'st thy hap (W. Alexander, OBEV)
Oh! for some honest Lovers ghost (Sir J. Suckling, Meta)
Oh how comely it is and how reviving (J. Milton, OBEV)
Oh, how shall I help to right the world that is going wrong(R.W. Gilder, YBAV)
Oh, I be vun of the useful troibe (A.C. Deane, MBP)
Oh, lovers' eyes are sharp to see (Sir W. Scott, Gold)
Oh mother of a mighty race (W.C. Bryant, YBAV)
O how much more doth beauty beauteous seem (W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
Oh, snatch'd away in beauty's bloom(G. Byron, Gold)
Oh, tell me less or tell me more (J.R. Lowell, YBAV)
Oh thou great Power, in whom I move (Sir H. Wotton, Meta)
Oh thou that swing'st upon the waving haire (R. Lovelace, Meta)
Oh, what 's the way to Arcady (H.C. Bunner, YBAV)
Oh, where the white quince blossom swings (O. Herford, MAP)
O if thou knew'st how thou thyself dost harm (W. Alexander, Gold)
O I hae come from far away (W.B. Scott, OBEV)
O joy of creation (F.B. Harte, OBEV)
Old house leans upon a tree (M. Cawein, MAP)
Old Uncle Jim was as blind as a mole (A. Corbin, MAP)
Old wine to drink(R.H. Messinger, YBAV)
O listen, listen, ladies gay(Sir W. Scott, Gold)
O listen to the sounding sea (G.W. Curtis, YBAV)
Olor Iscanus queries: Why should we (J.G. Whittier, YBAV)
O lusty May, with Flora queen(Anonymous, OBEV)
O many a day have I made good ale in the glen (J.J. Callanan, OBEV)
O Mary, at thy window be (R. Burns, Gold)
O Mary, at thy window be (R. Burns, OBEV)
O Mary, go and call the cattle home (C. Kingsley, OBEV)
O memory, thou fond deceiver (O. Goldsmith, OBEV)
O me! what eyes hath Love put in my head (W. Shakespeare, Gold)
O mistress mine, where are you roaming(W. Shakespeare, Gold)
O mistress mine, where are you roaming(W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
YBAV (Lowell , 102)
O mortal folk, you may behold and see (S. Hawes, OBEV)
O Mother Earth! upon thy lap (J.G. Whittier, YBAV)
O my Dark Rosaleen (J.C. Mangan, OBEV)
O my deir hert, young Jesus sweit (Anonymous, OBEV)
O my Lucasia, let us speak our Love (K. Philips, Meta)
O my Luve 's like a red, red rose (R. Burns, OBEV)
O my Luve's like a red, red rose (R. Burns, Gold)
On a day, alack the day(W. Shakespeare, Gold)
On a day—alack the day(W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
On a Poet's lips I slept (P.B. Shelley, Gold)
On a starr'd night Prince Lucifer uprose (G. Meredith, OBEV)
On a time the amorous Silvy (Anonymous, OBEV)
Once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee (W. Wordsworth, Gold)
Once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee (W. Wordsworth, OBEV)
Once, in the sultry heat of midsummer (A. Lowell, MAP)
Once this soft turf, this rivulet's sands (W.C. Bryant, YBAV)
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary (E.A. Poe, YBAV)
One asked of regret (R. Le Gallienne, MBP)
On either side the river lie (A. Tennyson, OBEV)
One more Unfortunate (T. Hood, Gold)
One more Unfortunate (T. Hood, OBEV)
One sweetly solemn thought (P. Cary, YBAV)
O never say that I was false of heart (W. Shakespeare, Gold)
O never say that I was false of heart (W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
One word is too often profaned (P.B. Shelley, Gold)
One word is too often profaned (P.B. Shelley, OBEV)
On Linden, when the sun was low (T. Campbell, Gold)
Only a man harrowing clods (T. Hardy, MBP)
Only a starveling singer seeks (A. Wickham, MBP)
Only tell her that I love (J. Cutts, OBEV)
On parent knees, a naked new-born child (Sir W. Jones, OBEV)
On the deck of Patrick Lynch's boat I sat in woful plight (G. Fox, OBEV)
On the Sabbath-day (A. Smith, OBEV)
On the wide level of a mountain's head (S.T. Coleridge, OBEV)
O perfect Light, which shaid away (A. Hume, OBEV)
Order is a lovely thing (A.H. Branch, MAP)
O're the smooth enameld green (J. Milton, OBEV)
Orpheus with his lute made trees (W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
O ruddier than the cherry(J. Gay, OBEV)
O saw ye bonnie Lesley (R. Burns, Gold)
O saw ye bonnie Lesley (R. Burns, OBEV)
O saw ye not fair Ines(T. Hood, OBEV)
O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light (F.S. Key, YBAV)
O say what is that thing call'd Light (C. Cibber, Gold)
O silver-throated Swan (T.S. Moore, MBP)
O sing unto my roundelay (T. Chatterton, OBEV)
O sleep, my babe, hear not the rippling wave (S. Coleridge, OBEV)
O soft embalmer of the still midnight(J. Keats, OBEV)
O sorrow(J. Keats, OBEV)
O talk not to me of a name great in story (G. Byron, Gold)
O that 'twere possible (A. Tennyson, OBEV)
Others abide our question. Thou art free (M. Arnold, OBEV)
O the sad day(T. Flatman, OBEV)
O thou, by Nature taught (W. Collins, OBEV)
O thou that swing'st upon the waving hair (R. Lovelace, OBEV)
O thou undaunted daughter of desires(R. Crashaw, OBEV)
O thou with dewy locks, who lookest down (W. Blake, OBEV)
O time! who know'st a lenient hand to lay (W.L. Bowles, OBEV)
O to be in England (R. Browning, OBEV)
MBP (Colum , 103)
O turn away those cruel eyes (T. Stanley, OBEV)
Our band is few but true and tried (W.C. Bryant, YBAV)
Our bugles sang truce, for the night-cloud had lower'd (T. Campbell, Gold)
Our vales are sweet with fern and rose (J.G. Whittier, YBAV)
Out of me unworthy and unknown (E.L. Masters, MAP)
Out of the hills of Habersham (S. Lanier, YBAV)
Out of the night that covers me (W.E. Henley, MBP)
Out of the night that covers me (W.E. Henley, OBEV)
Out of the wood of thoughts that grows by night (E. Thomas, MBP)
Outside hove Shasta, snowy height on height (W. Bynner, MAP)
Out upon it, I have lov'd (Sir J. Suckling, Meta)
Out upon it, I have loved (Sir J. Suckling, OBEV)
Over hill, over dale (W. Shakespeare, OBEV)
Over the mountains (Anonymous, Gold)
Over the mountains (Anonymous, OBEV)
Over the river, on the hill (R. Cooke, YBAV)
Over the river they beckon to me (N. Wakefield, YBAV)
Over the sea our galleys went (R. Browning, OBEV)
Over the shoulders and slopes of the dune (B. Carman, MAP)
O waly waly up the bank (Anonymous, Gold)
O waly, waly, up the bank (Anonymous, OBEV)
O were my Love yon lilac fair (R. Burns, OBEV)
O western wind, when wilt thou blow (Anonymous, OBEV)
O what a plague is love(Anonymous, OBEV)
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms (J. Keats, Gold)
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms (J. Keats, OBEV)
O wha will shoe my bonny foot(Anonymous, OBEV)
O which is the last rose(J. Davidson, OBEV)
O who shall, from this Dungeon, raise (A. Marvell, Meta)
O Wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being (P.B. Shelley, Gold)
O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being (P.B. Shelley, OBEV)
O world, be nobler, for her sake(L. Binyon, OBEV)
O world, I cannot hold thee close enough(E.S. Millay, MAP)
O world, in very truth thou art too young (W.S. Blunt, OBEV)
O World! O Life! O Time(P.B. Shelley, Gold)
O yonge fresshe folkes, he or she (G. Chaucer, OBEV)
O you plant the pain in my heart with your wistful eyes (J. Todhunter, OBEV)
 



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