Verse > Anthologies > Samuel Kettell, ed. > Specimens of American Poetry
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Samuel Kettell, ed.  Specimens of American Poetry.  1829.
 
Critical and Biographical Notice
Anthony Bleecker (1770–1827)
ANTHONY BLEECKER was descended from an old New York family, and was born in that state not long after the Declaration of Independence. He was educated after the peace in the city of New York, and completed his studies at Columbia College, where he studied about the same time with the late Governor De Witt Clinton, Vice President Tompkins, the Rev. Dr Mason, and other distinguished men, whose friendship he preserved throughout life. His tastes and habits were purely literary, but the state of society in the country at that time, afforded no encouragement for authorship, and the circumstances of his family compelled him to embrace some profession. He therefore devoted himself, though reluctantly, to the study and practice of the Law. He never succeeded as an advocate, for he was deficient in the talent of popular speaking, and an unconquerable diffidence hindered him from overcoming or overlooking this defect. He, however, became highly respected in his profession, for practical good sense, accurate and useful learning, and stainless honor and integrity. He settled in the City of New York, where his life flowed on equably in the quiet “chamber business” of the law, and particularly the equity practice, interspersed with various literary pursuits, until his fiftieth year, when, after a short illness, he died in the spring of 1827. Few men have led a more blameless and honorable life. Though a private citizen, without fortune, or political distinction, his death was widely felt as a public loss. His literary career corresponded to the general character of his mind. He never formally appeared before the public as an author, yet for thirty years, the newspapers and periodical literature of New York and Philadelphia, were constantly indebted to his lively fancy and good taste. Some of the most esteemed publications of the day owed much of their attraction to his aid, suggestion, or correction—the extent of which was known only to his immediate circle of friends. His poetry is all occasional, and may be found scattered through various literary journals, form 1800 to 1825.
 
 
 
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