Reference > Quotations > Robert Christy, comp. > Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages
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Robert Christy, comp.  Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages.  1887.
 
Book
 
A book’s a book although there’s nothing in it.  1
A book that remains shut is but a block.  2
A good book is the best of friends, the same to-day and forever.  Tupper.  3
A good book praises itself.  German.  4
A great book is a great evil.  Greek, Dutch.  5
A library is a repository of medicine for the mind.  Greek.  6
A wicked book is the wickeder because it cannot repent.  7
According to the mercantile code the best book is a profitable ledger.  Gibbon.  8
Beware of the man of one book.  Latin.  9
Book-keeping taught in one lesson,—don’t lend them.  Punch.  10
Books are for company, the best friends and counsellors.  Writer of the Sixteenth Century.  11
Books can never teach the use of books.  Bacon.  12
Books cannot always please, however good,
Minds are not ever craving for their food.  Crabbe.
  13
Books don’t tell when de bee-martin an de chicken-hawk fell out.  African American.  14
Books like proverbs receive their value from the stamp and esteem of ages through which they have passed.  Sir William Temple.  15
Books should to one of these four ends conduce,
For wisdom, piety, delight or use.  Denham.
  16
Books were only invented to aid the memory.  Petrarch.  17
Books will speak plain when counsellors blanch.  Bacon.  18
Good books like good friends are few and chosen, the more select the more enjoyable.  Alcott.  19
Have thy study full of books rather than thy purse full of money.  Lilly.  20
He that loveth a book will never want a faithful friend, a wholesome counsellor, a cheerful companion, an effectual comforter.  Isaac Barrow.  21
He who has published an injurious book sins in his very grave, corrupts others while he is rotting himself.  Robert South.  22
I never knew more sweet and happy hours than I employed upon my books.  James Shirley.  23
It is vain to fish without a hook or learn to read without a book.  Danish.  24
Judge not a book by its cover.  25
Like the parson of Saddleworth who could read in no book but his own.  26
No book is so bad but that something may be learned from it.  Pliny.  27
Oh! that mine enemy would write a book.  28
Old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.  Alonzo of Aragon.  29
Something is learned every time a book is opened.  Chinese.  30
The best books are those which the reader thinks he could have written himself.  31
The fountain of wisdom flows through books.  Greek.  32
The learning of books that you do not make your own wisdom is money in the hands of another in time of need.  Sanscrit.  33
There is no friend so faithful as a good book.  34
There is no worse robber than a bad book.  Italian.  35
We are as liable to be corrupted by books as by companions.  Fielding.  36
Word by word the great books are made.  French.  37
Years know more than books.  38
 
 
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