Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Riff-raff.

 Rif of Rifie (French).Rifle 
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E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
 
Riff-raff.
 
The offscouring of society, or rather, “refuse and sweepings.” Rief is Anglo-Saxon, and means a rag; Raff is also Anglo-Saxon, and means sweepings. (Danish, rips-raps.) The French have the expression “Avoir rifle et rafle,” meaning to have everything; whence radoux (one who has everything), and the phrase “Il n’a laissé ni rif ni raf” (he has left nothing behind him).   1
        “I have neither ryff nor ruff [rag to cover me nor roof over my head].”—Sharp: Coventry Myst., p. 224.
       
“Ilka man agayne his gud he gaffe
That he had tane with ryfe and raffe.”
       
Quoted by Halliwell in his Archaic Dictionary.
 


 Rif of Rifie (French).Rifle 

 
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