Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Bailiff.

 Bailey.Bailleur. 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
 
Bailiff.
 
At Constantinople, the person who had charge of the imperial children used to be called the bajulus, from baios, a child. The word was subsequently attached to the Venetian consul at Constantinople, and the Venetian ambassador was called the balio, a word afterwards extended to any superintendent or magistrate. In France the bailli was a superintendent of the royal domains and commander of the troops. In time, any superintendent of even a private estate was so called, whence our farmer’s bailiff. The sheriff is the king’s bailiff—a title now applied almost exclusively to his deputies or officers. (See BUMBAILIFF.)   1
 


 Bailey.Bailleur. 

 
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