Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Lilli-Burle’ro or Lilli-Bulle’ro and Bullen-a-lah.

 Li’lis or Li’lith (Rabbinical mythology).Lilliput. 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
 
Lilli-Burle’ro or Lilli-Bulle’ro and Bullen-a-lah.
 
Said to have been the words of distinction used by the Irish Papists in their massacres of the Protestants in 1641. A song with the refrain of “Lilli-burlero, bullen-a-la!” was written by Lord Wharton, which had a more powerful effect than the philippics of either Demosthens or Cicero, and contributed not a little to the great revolution of 1688. Burnet says, “It made an impression on the [king’s] army that cannot be imagined… . The whole army, and at last the people, both in city and country, were singing it perpetually … never had so slight a thing so great an effect.” The song is in Percy’s Reliques of Ancient English Poetry, series ii. bk. 3. (See Sterne: Tristram Shandy, chap. ii.)   1
       
“Lilli bullero, lilli bullero bullen a la,
Lero lero, lilli bullero, lero lero bullen a la,
Lero lero, lilli bullero, lero lero bullen a la.”
   Mr. Chappell attributes the air to Henry Purcell.   2
 


 Li’lis or Li’lith (Rabbinical mythology).Lilliput. 

 
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