Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Mermaids
 
O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note,
To drown me in thy sister’s flood of tears.
        Comedy of Errors. Act III. Sc. 2. L. 45.
  1
    Since once I sat upon a promontory,
And heard a mermaid on a dolphin’s back
Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath,
That the rude sea grew civil at her song:
And certain stars shot madly from their spheres,
To hear the sea-maid’s music.
        Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act II. Sc. 1. L. 149.
  2
            Who would be
            A mermaid fair,
            Singing alone,
            Combing her hair
            Under the sea,
            In a golden curl
            With a comb of pearl,
            On a throne?
    I would be a mermaid fair;
I would sing to myself the whole of the day;
With a comb of pearl I would comb my hair;
And still as I comb I would sing and say,
“Who is it loves me? who loves not me?”
        Tennyson—The Mermaid.
  3
Slow sail’d the weary mariners and saw,
Betwixt the green brink and the running foam,
Sweet faces, rounded arms, and bosoms prest
To little harps of gold; and while they mused
Whispering to each other half in fear,
Shrill music reach’d them on the middle sea.
        Tennyson—The Sea Fairies.
  4
 
 
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