Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Injury
 
                ’Twas he
Gave heat unto the injury, which returned
Like a petard ill lighted, unto the bosom
Of him gave fire to it.
        Beaumont—Fair Maid of the Inn. Act II.
  1
Accipere quam facere injuriam præstat.
  It is better to receive than to do an injury.
        Cicero—Tusculanarum Disputationum. V. 19.
  2
Wit’s an unruly engine, wildly striking
Sometimes a friend, sometimes the engineer.
        Herbert—Church Porch.
  3
Plerumque dolor etiam venustos facit.
  A strong sense of injury often gives point to the expression of our feelings.
        Pliny the Younger—Epistles. III. 9.
  4
  Aut potentior te, aut imbecillior læsit: si imbecillior, parce illi; si potentior, tibi.
  He who has injured thee was either stronger or weaker. If weaker, spare him; if stronger, spare thyself.
        Seneca—De Ira. III. 5.
  5
For ’tis the sport to have the engineer
Hoist with his own petar.
        Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 4.
  6
 
 
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