Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Debt
 
I hold every man a debtor to his profession.
        Bacon—Maxims of the Law. Preface.
  1
I owe you one.
        George Colman, the Younger—The Poor Gentleman. Act I. 2.
  2
Anticipated rents, and bills unpaid,
Force many a shining youth into the shade,
Not to redeem his time, but his estate,
And play the fool, but at the cheaper rate.
        Cowper—Retirement. L. 559.
  3
Wilt thou seal up the avenues of ill?
Pay every debt as if God wrote the bill!
        Emerson—Suum Cuique.
  4
  A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.
        Alex. Hamilton—Letter to Robert Morris. April 30, 1781.
  5
  At the time we were funding our national debt, we heard much about “a public debt being a public blessing”; that the stock representing it was a creation of active capital for the aliment of commerce, manufactures and agriculture.
        Thomas Jefferson—On Public Debts. Letter to John W. Epps. Nov. 6, 1813.
  6
The slender debt to Nature’s quickly paid,
Discharged, perchance with greater ease than made.
        Quarles—Emblems. Bk. II. Emblem 13.
  7
  Debtes et mensonges sont ordinairement ensemble ralliés.
  Debts and lies are generally mixed together.
        Rabelais—Pantagruel. Bk. III. Ch. V.
  8
Our national debt a national blessing.
        Samuel Wilkerson. Used as a broadside issued by Jay Cooke, June, 1865. Qualified by H. C. Fahnstock, “How our national debt may be a national blessing.”
  9
 
 
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