Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Cat
 
A cat may look at a king.
        Title of a Pamphlet. (Published 1652).
  1
Lauk! what a monstrous tail our cat has got!
        Henry Carey—The Dragon of Wantley. Act II. Sc. 1.
  2
  Mrs. Crupp had indignantly assured him that there wasn’t room to swing a cat there; but as Mr. Dick justly observed to me, sitting down on the foot of the bed, nursing his leg. “You know, Trotwood, I don’t want to swing a cat. I never do swing a cat. Therefore what does that signify to me!”
        Dickens—David Copperfield. Vol. II. Ch. VI.
  3
Confound the cats! All cats—alway—
Cats of all colours, black, white, grey;
By night a nuisance and by day—
          Confound the cats!
        Orlando Thos. Dobbin—A Dithyramb on Cats.
  4
The Cat in Gloves catches no Mice.
        Benj. Franklin—Poor Richard’s Almanac.
  5
The cat would eat fish, and would not wet her feet.
        Heywood—Proverbs. Pt. I. Ch. XI.
  6
  It has been the providence of nature to give this creature nine lives instead of one.
        Pilpay—Fable III.
  7
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors