Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Bores
 
Society is now one polished horde,
Formed of two mighty tribes, the Bores and Bored.
        Byron—Don Juan. Canto XIII. St. 95.
  1
  The bore is usually considered a harmless creature, or of that class of irrational bipeds who hurt only themselves.
        Maria Edgeworth—Thoughts on Bores.
  2
Got the ill name of augurs, because they were bores.
        Lowell—A Fable for Critics, L. 55.
  3
L’ennui naquit un jour de l’uniformité.
  One day ennui was born from uniformity.
        Motte.
  4
That old hereditary bore,
The steward.
        Rogers—Italy. A Character. L. 13.
  5
Again I hear that creaking step!—
  He’s rapping at the door!
Too well I know the boding sound
  That ushers in a bore.
        J. G. Saxe—My Familiar.
  6
He says a thousand pleasant things,—
  But never says “Adieu.”
        J. G. Saxe—My Familiar.
  7
          O, he’s as tedious
As is a tir’d horse, a railing wife;
Worse than a smoky house; I had rather live
With cheese and garlic in a windmill, far,
Than feed on cates, and have him talk to me,
In any summer-house in Christendom.
        Henry IV. Pt. I. Act III. Sc. I. L. 159.
  8
 
 
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