Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Dog
 
Every dog must have his day.
        Swift.—Whig and Tory.
  1
Dogs, ye have had your day.
        Pope.—The Odyssey, Book XXII. Line 41.
  2
Let Hercules himself do what he may,
The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.
        Shakespeare.—Hamlet, Act V. Scene 1. (The Prince to his Uncle.)
  3
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon.
        Shakespeare.—Julius Cæsar, Act IV. Scene 3. (Brutus to Cassius.)
  4
Nor dare they bark, though much provoked at her refulgent visage.
        Swift.—Battle of the Books. (Episode of Bentley and Wotton.)
  5
Doth the moon care for the barking of a dog?
        Burton.—Anat. of Mel., Part II. Sect. III. Mem. 7.
  6
I am his Highness’s dog at Kew!
Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?
        Pope.—On the Collar of a Dog he gave to the Prince.
  7
The watch-dog’s voice that bay’d the whispering wind,
And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind.
        Goldsmith.—Deserted Village, Line 121.
  8
Thou dog in forehead, but in heart a deer.
        Homer.—The Iliad, Book I. Line 298. (Pope.)
  9
Having the countenance of a dog, but heart of a stag.
        Homer.—The Iliad, Book I. (Riley’s translat.), Page 9.
  10
 
 
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