Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
Your voices break and falter in the darkness,—
Break, falter, and are still.
        Bret Harte.—The Angelus, Last Stanza.
Can the tolling of the Old South bell be painted?
        Hawthorne.—American Note-Books. Salem, September 14, 1841.
When o’er the street the morning peal is flung
From yon tall belfry with the brazen tongue,
Its wide vibrations, wafted by the gale,
To each far listener tell a different tale.
        Holmes.—The Bells.
Those dumb mouths that have no speech,
Only a cry from each to each,
  In its own kind, with its own laws;
Something that is beyond the reach
Of human power to learn or teach,—
An inarticulate moan of pain,
Like the immeasurable main
Breaking upon an unknown beach.
        Longfellow.—Tales of a Wayside Inn: The Bell of Atri, Interlude, Line 2.

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