Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Swan
 
The dying swan is said to utter a pleasing song, and the poets have for ages attested its truth. We will give a few specimens.
Foreseeing how happy it is to die, they leave this world with singing and joy.
        Yonge’s Cicero.—Tusculan Disputations, Book I. Div. 30.
  1
Lamenting, in a low voice, her very woes, as when the swan, now about to die, sings his own funeral dirge.
        Riley’s Ovid, Metamorphoses, Picus and Canens, Page 499.
  2
Thus does the white swan, as he lies on the wet grass, when the Fates summon him, sing at the fords of Mæander.
        Riley’s Ovid.—Epistle 7, Page 63.
  3
  [And see Spenser, in the “Ruins of Time;” Shakespeare, in the Merchant of Venice, Act III. Scene 2—King John, Act V. Scene 7—Othello, Act V. Scene 2; Cowley, in his Pyramus and Thisbe; Garth, in the Dispensary; Pope, in Windsor Forest—Rape of the Lock—Winter a Pastoral; Prior’s Turtle and Sparrow; Fenton’s Florelio; Lansdowne, in the Muses’ Dying Song; and Shelley, in “the Alastor.”]  4
And sung his dying sonnets to the fiddle.
        Peter Pindar.—The Lousiad, Canto 1.
  5
 
 
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