Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Beauty
 
Ay, my continent of beauty.
        Shakespeare.—Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act IV. Scene 1. (Boyet to Rosaline.)
  1
Beauty in distress shone like the sun
Piercing a Summer’s cloud.
        Colman, Jun.—Battle of Hexham, Act I. Scene 3.
  2
When beauty in distress appears,
An irresistless charm it bears:
In every breast does pity move,
Pity, the tenderest part of love.
        Yalden.—To Captain Chamberlain, Verse 3.
  3
Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll;
Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.
        Pope.—Rape of the Lock, Canto V. Line 33.
  4
Nature in various moulds has beauty cast,
And form’d the feature for each different taste:
This sighs for golden locks and azure eyes;
That for the gloss of sable tresses dies.
        Gay.—Dione, Act III. Scene 1.
  5
Were you with these, my prince, you’d soon forget
The pale, unripen’d beauties of the north.
        Addison.—Cato, Act I.
  6
’Tis not a set of features, nor complexion,
The tincture of a skin that I admire;
Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover,
Fades in the eye, and palls upon the sense.
        Addison.—Cato, Act I. Scene 1.
  7
’Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call,
But the joint force and full result of all.
        Pope.—On Criticism, Line 245.
  8
Half light, half shade,
She stood, a sight to make an old man young.
        Tennyson.—The Gardener’s Daughter.
  9
Where none admire, ’tis useless to excel;
Where none are beaux, ’tis vain to be a belle;
Beauty like wit, to judges should be shewn;
Both most are valued, where they best are known.
        Lyttleton.—Soliloquy of a Beauty, Line 11.
  10
Fair tresses man’s imperial race ensnare,
And beauty draws us with a single hair.
        Pope.—Rape of the Lock, Canto II. Line 28.
  11
She knows her man, and when you rant and swear,
Can draw you to her with a single hair.
        Dryden.—Sat. of Persius.
  12
’Tis a powerful sex; they were too strong for the first, the strongest, and the wisest man that was; they must needs be strong, when one hair of a woman can draw more than a hundred pair of oxen.
        Howell.—Familiar Letters, Book II. No. 4. (To T. D., Esq.)
  13
And Beauty slumber’d in the arms of Love.
        Roscoe.—To Henry Fuseli. The Metrical Miscellany.
  14
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness.
        Keats.—Endymion, Line 1.
  15
Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night,
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear.
        Shakespeare.—Romeo and Juliet, Act I. Scene 5. (Romeo to the Servant.)
  16
Let him alone;
There’s nothing that allays an angry mind
So soon as a sweet beauty.
        Beaumont and Fletcher.—The Elder Brother.
  17
The beauty, that of late was in her flow’r, is now a ruin.
        Quarles.—Book I. No. IX. Verse 5.
  18
 
 
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