Verse > Harvard Classics > Robert Burns > Poems and Songs
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Robert Burns (1759–1796).  Poems and Songs.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
470. Song—She says she loes me best of a’
 
 
Tune—“Oonagh’s Waterfall.”
 
 
SAE flaxen were her ringlets,
  Her eyebrows of a darker hue,
Bewitchingly o’er-arching
  Twa laughing e’en o’ lovely blue;
Her smiling, sae wyling.        5
  Wad make a wretch forget his woe;
What pleasure, what treasure,
  Unto these rosy lips to grow!
Such was my Chloris’ bonie face,
  When first that bonie face I saw;        10
And aye my Chloris’ dearest charm—
  She says, she lo’es me best of a’.
 
Like harmony her motion,
  Her pretty ankle is a spy,
Betraying fair proportion,        15
  Wad make a saint forget the sky:
Sae warming, sae charming,
  Her faultless form and gracefu’ air;
Ilk feature—auld Nature
  Declar’d that she could do nae mair:        20
Hers are the willing chains o’ love,
  By conquering Beauty’s sovereign law;
And still my Chloris’ dearest charm—
  She says, she lo’es me best of a’.
 
Let others love the city,        25
  And gaudy show, at sunny noon;
Gie me the lonely valley,
  The dewy eve and rising moon,
Fair beaming, and streaming,
  Her silver light the boughs amang;        30
While falling; recalling,
  The amorous thrush concludes his sang;
There, dearest Chloris, wilt thou rove,
  By wimpling burn and leafy shaw,
And hear my vows o’ truth and love,        35
  And say, thou lo’es me best of a’.
 

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