Nonfiction > Theodore Roosevelt > Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children
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Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919).  Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children.  1919.

31. THE ART OF UNCLE REMUS
(To Joel Chandler Harris)
 
White House, Oct. 12, 1901.    

MY DEAR HARRIS:
  It is worth while being President when one's small daughter receives that kind of an autograph gift. When I was younger than she is, my Aunt Annie Bulloch, of Georgia, used to tell me some of the brer rabbit stories, especially brer rabbit and the tar baby. But fond though I am of the brer rabbit stories I think I am even fonder of your other writings. I doubt if there is a more genuinely pathetic tale in all our literature than "Free Joe." Moreover I have felt that all that you write serves to bring our people closer together. I know, of course, the ordinary talk is that an artist should be judged purely by his art; but I am rather a Philistine and like to feel that the art serves a good purpose. Your art is not only an art addition to our sum of national achievement, but it has also always been an addition to the forces that tell for decency, and above all for the blotting out of sectional antagonism.
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