Nonfiction > Theodore Roosevelt > Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children
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Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919).  Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children.  1919.

113. GOOD READING FOR PACIFISTS
 
March 4, 1908.    

DEAREST KERMIT:
  You have recently been writing me about Dickens. Senator Lodge gave me the following first-class quotation from a piece by Dickens about "Proposals for Amusing Posterity":
   1
  "And I would suggest that if a body of gentlemen possessing their full phrenological share of the combative and antagonistic organs, could only be induced to form themselves into a society for Declaiming about Peace, with a very considerable war-whoop against all non-declaimers; and if they could only be prevailed upon to sum up eloquently the many unspeakable miseries and horrors of War, and to present them to their own country as a conclusive reason for its being undefended against War, and becoming a prey of the first despot who might choose to inflict those miseries and horrors—why then I really believe we should have got to the very best joke we could hope to have in our whole Complete Jest-Book for Posterity and might fold our arms and rest convinced that we had done enough for that discerning Patriarch's amusement."   2
  This ought to be read before all the tomfool peace societies and anti-imperialist societies of the present-day.   3
 
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