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  The Story of the Volsungs and Niblungs.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
The Story of the Volsungs and Niblungs
 
XXXVII. The Battle in the Burg of King Atli
 
 
  THEN they rode unto the king’s hall, and King Atli arrayed his host for battle, and the ranks were so set forth that a certain wall there was betwixt them and the brethren.  1
  “Welcome hither,” said he. “Deliver unto me that plenteous gold which is mine of right; even the wealth which Sigurd once owned, and which is now Gudrun’s of right.”  2
  Gunnar answered, “Never gettest thou that wealth; and men of might must thou meet here, or ever we lay by life if thou wilt deal with us in battle: ah, belike thou settest forth this feast like a great man, and wouldst not hold thine hand from erne and wolf!”  3
  “Long ago I had it in my mind,” said Atli, “to take the lives of you, and be lord of the gold, and reward you for that deed of shame, wherein ye beguiled the best of all your affinity; but now shall I revenge him.”  4
  Hogni answered, “Little will it avail to lie long brooding over that rede, leaving the work undone.”  5
  And therewith they fell to hard fighting, at the first brunt with shot.  6
  But therewithal came the tidings to Gudrun, and when she heard thereof she grew exceeding wroth, and cast her mantle from her, and ran out and greeted those new-comers, and kissed her brethren, and showed them all love, — and the last of all greetings was that betwixt them.  7
  Then said she, “I thought I had set forth counsels whereby ye should not come hither, but none may deal with his shapen fate.” And withal she said, “Will it avail aught to seek for peace?”  8
  But stoutly and grimly they said nay thereto. So she sees that the game goeth sorely against her brethren, and she gathers to her great stoutness of heart, and does on her a mail-coat and takes to her a sword, and fights by her brethren, and goes as far forward as the bravest of manfolk: and all spoke in one wise that never saw any fairer defence than in her.  9
  Now the men fell thick, and far before all others was the fighting of those brethren, and the battle endured a long while unto midday; Gunnar and Hogni went right through the folk of Atli, and so tells the tale that all the mead ran red with blood; the sons of Hogni withal set on stoutly.  10
  Then spake Atli the king, “A fair host and a great have we, and mighty champions withal, and yet have many of us fallen, and but evil am I apaid in that nineteen of my champions are slain, and but six left alive.”  11
  And therewithal was there a lull in the battle.  12
  Then spake Atli the king, “Four brethren were we, and now am I left alone; great affinity I gat to me, and deemed my fortune well sped thereby; a wife I had, fair and wise, high of mind, and great of heart; but no joyance may I have of her wisdom, for little peace is betwixt us, — but ye — ye have slain many of my kin, and beguiled me of realm and riches, and for the greatest of all woes have slain my sister withal.”  13
  Quoth Hogni, “Why babblest thou thus? thou wert the first to break the peace. Thou didst take my kinswoman and pine her to death by hunger, and didst murder her, and take her wealth; an ugly deed for a king! — meet for mocking and laughter I deem it, that thou must needs make long tale of thy woes; rather will I give thanks to the Gods that thou fallest into ill.”  14
 

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