Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > French
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The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vols. X–XI: French
 
Lizzy’s Peccadilloes
By Pierre Jean de Béranger (1780–1857)
 
From “Songs”

LIZ, as mistress o’er all,
  E’en my wine, you may reign;
But ’tis martyrdom for me
  To ask it in vain.
And if glasses you count        5
  At my age, fickle jade—
Pray, have I ever counted
  The slips you have made?
Ah, Liz, all along
  You’ve deceived me—and yet        10
I would fain have a bumper,
  To toast my grisette!
 
Lindor’s impudence spoils
  All the tricks you devise:
Softly breathed are his words;        15
  Deeply drawn are his sighs.
Of his tenderest hopes
  I’m instructed by him—
Lest I scold you for this,
  Fill at least to the brim!        20
Ah, Liz, all along
  You’ve deceived me—and yet
I would fain have a bumper,
  To toast my grisette!
 
With Clitander so blest        25
  When I caught you at last,
You were tenderly counting
  The kisses that passed.
To redouble their sum
  Didn’t cause you much pain—        30
Come, for all of those kisses
  Fill, fill up again!
Ah, Liz, all along
  You’ve deceived me—and yet
I would fain have a bumper,        35
  To toast my grisette!
 
Giving jewels and lace
  Mondor, free of his purse,
Plays with you in my presence,
  Nor finds you averse.        40
Nay, I’ve seen him, grown bold,
  Put his arm round your waist—
For a rascal so great
  To the dregs let me taste!
Ah, Liz, all along        45
  You’ve deceived me—and yet
I would fain have a bumper,
  To toast my grisette!
 
Then I saw, as I entered
  Your chamber one night,        50
Through the window a robber
  On tiptoe take flight.
’Twas the rogue I had sent
  From your parlor, that eve—
Come, a fresh bottle bring,        55
  Lest too much I perceive.
Ah, Liz, all along
  You’ve deceived me—and yet
I would fain have a bumper,
  To toast my grisette!        60
 
All enriched with your favors,
  We’ve both the same friends;
Those of whom you are weary
  My favor attends.
But, then, traitress, with them        65
  You must let me drink deep;
Be my mistress for aye,
  And our friends let us keep!
Ah, Liz, all along
  You’ve deceived me—and yet        70
I would fain have a bumper,
  To toast my grisette!
 
 
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