Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > French
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX TO AUTHORS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vols. X–XI: French
 
Advice to a Friend on Marriage
By Eustache Deschamps (1346?–1406)
 
OPE! Who? A friend! What wouldst obtain?
  Advice! Whereof? Is’t well to wed?
I wish to marry. What’s your pain?
  No wife have I for board and bed,
  By whom my house is wisely led.        5
One meek and fair I wish to gain,
  Young, wealthy, too, and nobly bred;
You’re crazy—batter out your brain!
 
Consider! Grief can you sustain?
  Women have tempers bold and dread;        10
When for a dish of eggs you’re fain,
  Broth, cheese, you’ll have before you spread:
  Now free, you’ll be a slave instead—
When married, you yourself have slain.
  Think well. My first resolve is said;        15
You’re crazy—batter out your brain!
 
No wife will be like her you feign;
  On angry words you shall be fed,
So shall you bitterly complain,
  With woes too hard to bear, bested:        20
  Better a life in forest led
Than of such beast to bear the strain.
  No! The sweet fancy fills my head;
You’re crazy—batter out your brain!
 
Envoy
Soon you will long that you were dead
        25
  When married; seek in street or lane
Some love. No! Passion bids me wed;
  You’re crazy—batter out your brain!
 
 
CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX TO AUTHORS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors