Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > American
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The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vols. I–V: American
 
The Rocks of Mt. Desert
College Humor
 
E. M. T., in “The Columbia Spectator”

THE SOFT light of the setting sun
  Across the water lay,
And dark against its glory rose
  The islands of the bay;
The air was still, upon the shore        5
  The pine-trees stood inert,
The quiet sea broke softly on
  The rocks of Mt. Desert.
 
The placid water mirrored back
  The glory of the skies,        10
But all the glow I heeded not
  For the light of two soft eyes;
And often as, so slightly raised,
  They did to mine revert,
No paradise, I felt, was like        15
  The rocks of Mt. Desert.
 
The murmuring sea I did not hear,
  For a voice of music sweet
That thrilled my heart, until I thought
  I almost heard it beat;        20
For all was still, upon the shore
  The pine-trees stood inert,
No sighing breezes swept across
  The rocks of Mt. Desert.
 
The sunset died, the sobbing sea        25
  I heard along the shore;
That thrilling voice, those tender eyes,
  Are gone forevermore.
She is not dead or gone away,
  The fickle little flirt,        30
But glorifies, to other eyes,
  The rocks of Mt. Desert.
 
 
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