Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. IX. Tragedy: Humor
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BOOK CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume IX. Tragedy: Humor.  1904.
 
Humorous Poems: II. Miscellaneous
Song of One Eleven Years in Prison
George Canning (1770–1827)
 
  WHENE’ER with haggard eyes I view
    This dungeon that I ’m rotting in,
  I think of those companions true
    Who studied with me at the U-
                niversity of Gottingen,        5
                niversity of Gottingen.
 
  [Weeps and pulls out a blue kerchief, with which he wipes his eyes; gazing tenderly at it, he proceeds:]

  Sweet kerchief, checked with heavenly blue,
    Which once my love sat knotting in—
  Alas, Matilda then was true!
    At least I thought so at the U-        10
                niversity of Gottingen,
                niversity of Gottingen.
 
  [At the repetition of this line he clanks his chains in cadence.]

  Barbs! barbs! alas! how swift you flew,
    Her neat post-wagon trotting in!
  Ye bore Matilda from my view;        15
    Forlorn I languished at the U-
                niversity of Gottingen,
                niversity of Gottingen.
 
  This faded form! this pallid hue!
    This blood my veins is clotting in!        20
  My years are many—they were few
    When first I entered at the U-
                niversity of Gottingen,
                niversity of Gottingen.
 
  There first for thee my passion grew,        25
    Sweet, sweet Matilda Pottingen!
  Thou wert the daughter of my tu-
    tor, law-professor at the U-
                niversity of Gottingen,
                niversity of Gottingen.        30
 
  Sun, moon, and thou, vain world, adieu,
    That kings and priests are plotting in;
  Here doomed to starve on water gru-
    el, never shall I see the U-
                niversity of Gottingen,        35
                niversity of Gottingen.

  [During the last stanza he dashes his head repeatedly against the walls of his prison, and finally so hard as to produce a visible contusion. He then throws himself on the floor in an agony. The curtain drops, the music still continuing to play till it is wholly fallen.]
 
 
CONTENTS · BOOK CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors