Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. VII. Descriptive: Narrative
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume VII. Descriptive: Narrative.  1904.
 
Descriptive Poems: I. Personal: Great Writers
Longfellow
Austin Dobson (1840–1921)
 
In Memoriam

     Nec turpem senectam
Degere, nec cithara carentem.

“NOT to be tuneless in old age!”
Ah! surely blest his pilgrimage,
  Who, in his winter’s snow,
Still sings with note as sweet and clear
As in the morning of the year        5
  When the first violets blow!
 
Blest!—but more blest, whom summer’s heat,
Whom spring’s impulsive stir and beat,
  Have taught no feverish lure;
Whose Muse, benignant and serene,        10
Still keeps his autumn chaplet green
  Because his verse is pure!
 
Lie calm, O white and laureate head!
Lie calm, O Dead, that art not dead,
  Since from the voiceless grave        15
Thy voice shall speak to old and young
While song yet speaks our English tongue
  By Charles’ or Thamis’ wave.
 
 
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