Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. V. Nature
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume V. Nature.  1904.
 
III. The Seasons
The Plough
Richard Henry Hengist Horne (1802–1884)
 
ABOVE yon sombre swell of land
    Thou seest the dawn’s grave orange hue,
With one pale streak like yellow sand,
    And over that a vein of blue.
 
The air is cold above the woods;        5
    All silent is the earth and sky,
Except with his own lonely moods
    The blackbird holds a colloquy.
 
Over the broad hill creeps a beam,
    Like hope that gilds a good man’s brow;        10
And now ascends the nostril-steam
    Of stalwart horses come to plough.
 
Ye rigid Ploughmen! bear in mind
    Your labor is for future hours.
Advance! spare not! nor look behind!        15
    Plough deep and straight with all your powers!
 
 
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