Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. IV. The Higher Life
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BOOK CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume IV. The Higher Life.  1904.
 
VI. Human Experience
Conscience and Remorse
Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906)
 
“GOOD-BYE,” I said to my Conscience—
  “Good-bye for aye and aye;”
And I put her hands off harshly,
  And turned my face away:
And Conscience, smitten sorely,        5
  Returned not from that day.
 
But a time came when my spirit
  Grew weary of its pace:
And I cried, “Come back, my Conscience,
  I long to see thy face;”        10
But Conscience cried, “I cannot,—
  Remorse sits in my place.”
 
 
CONTENTS · BOOK CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors