Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. III. Sorrow and Consolation
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume III. Sorrow and Consolation.  1904.
 
I. Disappointment in Love
Unrequited Love
William Shakespeare (1564–1616)
 
From “Twelfth Night,” Act I. Sc. 4.

  VIOLA.—Ay, but I know,—
  DUKE.—What dost thou know?
  VIOLA.—Too well what love women to men may owe:
In faith, they are as true of heart as we.
My father had a daughter loved a man,        5
As it might be, perhaps, were I a woman,
I should your lordship.
  DUKE.—And what ’s her history?
  VIOLA.—A blank, my lord. She never told her love,
But let concealment, like a worm i’ the bud,        10
Feed on her damask cheek; she pined in thought;
And, with a green and yellow melancholy,
She sat like Patience on a monument,
Smiling at grief. Was not this love, indeed?
We men may say more, swear more: but, indeed,        15
Our shows are more than will; for still we prove
Much in our vows, but little in our love.
 
 
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