Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. II. Love
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume II. Love.  1904.
 
IV. Wooing and Winning
How to Ask and Have
Samuel Lover (1797–1868)
 
“OH, ’t is time I should talk to your mother,
        Sweet Mary,” says I.
“Oh, don’t talk to my mother,” says Mary,
        Beginning to cry:
“For my mother says men are deceivers,        5
    And never, I know, will consent;
She says girls in a hurry who marry
        At leisure repent.”
 
“Then suppose I would talk to your father,
        Sweet Mary,” says I.        10
“Oh, don’t talk to my father,” says Mary,
        Beginning to cry:
“For my father, he loves me so dearly,
    He ’ll never consent I should go—
If you talk to my father,” says Mary,        15
        “He ’ll surely say ‘No.’”
 
“Then how shall I get you, my jewel?
        Sweet Mary,” says I.
“If your father and mother ’s so cruel,
        Most surely I ’ll die!”        20
“Oh, never say die, dear,” says Mary:
    “A way now to save you I see:
Since my parents are both so contrary—
        You ’d better ask me.”
 
 
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