Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. II. Love
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume II. Love.  1904.
 
III. Love’s Beginnings
“Smile and never heed me”
Charles Swain (1801–1874)
 
THOUGH, when other maids stand by,
I may deign thee no reply,
Turn not then away, and sigh,—
    Smile, and never heed me!
If our love, indeed, be such        5
As must thrill at every touch,
Why should others learn as much?—
    Smile, and never heed me!
 
Even if, with maiden pride,
I should bid thee quit my side,        10
Take this lesson for thy guide,—
    Smile, and never heed me!
But when stars and twilight meet,
And the dew is falling sweet,
And thou hear’st my coming feet,—        15
    Then—thou then—mayst heed me!
 
 
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