Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. I. Of Home: of Friendship
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume I. Of Home: of Friendship.  1904.
 
Poems of Friendship
Friendship
William Shakespeare (1564–1616)
 
From “Hamlet,” Act III. Sc. 2.

  HAMLET.—Horatio, thou art e’en as just a man
As e’er my conversation coped withal.
  HORATIO.—O my dear lord—
  HAMLET.—        Nay, do not think I flatter:
For what advancement may I hope from thee
That no revènue hast but thy good spirits,        5
To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flattered?
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee,
Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,        10
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath sealed thee for herself; for thou hast been
As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,—
A man that Fortune’s buffets and rewards
Hast ta’en with equal thanks; and blessed are those        15
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for Fortune’s finger
To sound what stop she please: Give me that man
That is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him
In my heart’s core, ay, in my heart of heart,        20
As I do thee.
 
 
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