Verse > Anthologies > Elizabethan Sonnets > The Tears of Fancie
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Seccombe and Arber, comps.  Elizabethan Sonnets.  1904.
 
The Tears of Fancie
Sonnet XXI. Fortune forwearied with my bitter mone
Thomas Watson (1555–1592)
 
FORTUNE forwearied with my bitter mone,
Did pittie seldome seene my wretched fate:
And brought to passe that I my loue alone
Vnwares attacht to plead my hard estate.
Some say that loue makes louers eloquent,        5
And with diuinest wit doth them inspire:
But beautie my tongues office did preuent,
And quite extinguished my first desire.
As if her eies had power to strike me dead,
So was I dased at her crimson die:        10
As one that had beheld Medusaes head,
All senses failed their Master but the eie.
Had that sense failed and from me eke beene taken,
Then I had loue and loue had me forsaken.
 
 
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