Nonfiction > François, duc de La Rochefoucauld > Moral Maxims and Reflections
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François, duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680).  Moral Maxims and Reflections.  1912.
 
Maxims, by Monsieur De la Rochefoucault
Part V
 
 
DCCXXXVIII
A Great many People give themselves up to Devotion, but no body gives himself up to Humility.
  738
DCCXXXIX
Bodily Labour keeps off Pain of Mind; and by so doing makes the Poor happy.
  739
DCCXL
The Mortifications which no body knows of, are Mortifications indeed, the rest are made easie by our Vanity.
  740
DCCXLI
The Altar on which God would have all our Sacrifices offered, is Humility.
  741
DCCXLII
A few Things suffice to make a wise Man happy, but it is not in the Power of any to content a Fool; and this is the true Reason why much the greatest Part of Mankind are miserable.
  742
DCCXLIII
We give our selves more Pain, to make Men think us happy, than to make our selves really so.
  743
DCCXLIV
It is much easier to quench a first Desire, than to satisfie all those that are sure to follow after.
  744
DCCXLV
Wisdom to the Mind, is as Health to the Body.
  745
DCCXLVI
In regard neither Health of Body, nor Peace of Mind, can be conferr’d by the Greatest Men upon Earth; the utmost Favours they can do us are bought too dear.
  746
DCCXLVII
Before we set our Hearts too much upon any Thing, let us examine how happy those are, who already possess it.
  747
DCCXLVIII
The greatest Treasure in this World, is a true Friend, and yet it is a Treasure which Men least trouble themselves to look after.
  748
DCCXLIX
Lovers are blind to the Failings of their Mistresses, till the ending of the Charm open their Eyes.
  749
DCCL
Prudence and Love were never made for one another; as much as you add to the one, you certainly take from the other.
  750
DCCLI
A jealous Wife gives her Husband this satisfaction at least, that he is sure, from her, continually to hear of what he loves.
  751
DCCLII
How sad a Case is that poor Woman in, who is at the same Time violently in Love, and inflexibly vertuous?
  752
DCCLIII
A wise Man finds it more for his Advantage, to decline the Combat, than to gain the Conquest.
  753
DCCLIV
There is more need of reading Men than Books.
  754
DCCLV
Good and ill Fortune commonly go to them, who had most of each before.
  755
DCCLVI
A good Wife is a hid Treasure, which he that hath found, does well not to brag of.
  756
DCCLVII
Most Women mourn the Loss of a Lover, not so much to shew how they loved before, as to gain the Reputation of deserving to be loved again.
  757
DCCLVIII
Faithfulness, when the Effect of Constraint, is very little better than Unfaithfulness.
  758
DCCLIX
No Women are worth our Jealousie, but such as decline giving occasion for it.
  759
DCCLX
Men that are too fond, do not easily discern, when their Passion ceases to be return’d.
  760
DCCLXI
We seldom allow any Men to have good Sense, who are not of our own Opinion.
  761
DCCLXII
Men find fault with themselves, purely to put others upon commending them.
  762
DCCLXIII
Little Souls take offence at the least Things.
  763
DCCLXIV
There are some Defects, which when placed in a convenient Light, look more agreeably than even Perfection it self.
  764
DCCLXV
We always think them troublesome, that our selves are troublesome to.
  765
DCCLXVI
A Man never finds it harder to speak as he ought, than when out of Countenance not to find something to say.
  766
DCCLXVII
No Faults are unpardonable in those who can prevail with themselves to acknowledge them.
  767
DCCLXVIII
Nothing is more natural to us, or imposes more upon us, than the Perswasion that we are beloved.
  768
DCCLXIX
We take more delight in seeing the Persons that have been beholden to us, than them to whom we are beholden.
  769
DCCLXX
There is more difficulty in concealing our real Sentiments, than in counterfeiting the Sentiments we have not.
  770
DCCLXXI
Friendships, after Reconciliation, are more nice to be kept, than those that were never broken at all.
  771
DCCLXXII
He that likes no body, hath a much worse Time of it, than he whom no body likes.
  772
 
 
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