Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
George Hakewill
 
  Time and chance happeneth to them all. Eccl. ix. 11. The meaning is, that the success of these outward things is not always carried by desert, but by chance in regard to us, though by Providence in regard of God.
George Hakewill.    
  1
 
  The sparks of truth being forced out of contention, as the sparks of fire out of the collision of flint and steel.
George Hakewill.    
  2
 
  What greater heart-breaking and confusion can there be to one than to have all his secret faults laid open, and the sentence of condemnation passed upon him?
George Hakewill.    
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  Some he punished exemplarily in this world, that we might from thence have a taste or glimpse of his future justice.
George Hakewill.    
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  Sir Walter Raleigh, so far as he hath gone in the History of the World, is matchable with the best of the ancients.
George Hakewill.    
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  Some God punisheth exemplarily in this world, that we might have a taste or glimpse of his present justice.
George Hakewill.    
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  This discourse of Cyprian, and the excellent flowers of rhetoric in it, show him to have been a sweet and powerful orator.
George Hakewill.    
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  It is no point of wisdom for a man to beat his brains about things impossible.
George Hakewill.    
  8
 
  It may justly serve for matter of extreme terror to the wicked, whether they regard the dreadfulness of the day in which they shall be tried, or the quality of the judge by whom they are to be tried.
George Hakewill: On Providence.    
  9
 
 
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