Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Sir John Denham
 
  There are certain garbs and modes of speaking which vary with the times; the fashion of our clothes being not more subject to alteration than that of our speech.
Sir John Denham.    
  1
 
  The three first parts I dedicate to my old friends, to take off those melancholy reflections which the sense of age, infirmity, and death may give them.
Sir John Denham.    
  2
 
  Scaliger, comparing the two orators, says that nothing can be taken from Demosthenes nor added to Tully.
Sir John Denham.    
  3
 
  If a heathen philosopher brings up arguments from reason, which none of our atheistical sophisters can confute, for the immortality of the soul, I hope they will so weigh the consequences as neither to talk nor live as if there was no such thing.
Sir John Denham.    
  4
 
  Whosoever offers at verbal translation shall have the misfortune of that young traveller who lost his own language abroad, and brought home no other instead of it.
Sir John Denham.    
  5
 
  Poetry is of so subtle a spirit that in the pouring out of one language into another it will all evaporate; and if a new spirit be not added in the transfusion there will remain nothing but a caput mortuum.
Sir John Denham.    
  6
 
  So few translations deserve praise, that I scarce ever saw any which deserved pardon.
Sir John Denham.    
  7
 
 
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