Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
George Crabb
 
  Whatever amuses serves to kill time, to lull the faculties, and to banish reflection. Whatever entertains usually awakens the understanding or gratifies the fancy. Whatever diverts is lively in its nature, and sometimes tumultuous in its effects.
George Crabb: Synonymes.    
  1
 
  Men of many words sometimes argue for the sake of talking; men of ready tongues frequently dispute for the sake of victory; men in public life often debate for the sake of opposing the ruling party, or from any other motive than the love of truth.
George Crabb: Synonymes.    
  2
 
  It ill corresponds with a profession of friendship to refuse assistance to a friend in the time of need.
George Crabb: Synonymes.    
  3
 
  Strong minds will be strongly bent, and usually labour under a strong bias; but there is no mind so weak and powerless as not to have its inclinations, and none so guarded as to be without its prepossessions.
George Crabb: Synonymes.    
  4
 
  Persevere is applied only to matters of some importance which demand a steady purpose of the mind; persist is used in respect to the ordinary business of life, as well as on more important occasions. A learner perseveres in his studies; a child may persist in making a request until he has obtained the object of his desire.
George Crabb: Synonymes.    
  5
 
 
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