Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
John Arbuthnot
 
  A recovery in my case and at my age is impossible: the kindest wish of my friends is euthanasia.
John Arbuthnot.    
  1
 
  The books of Varro concerning navigation have been lost, which would have given us great light in these matters.
John Arbuthnot.    
  2
 
  He is exact in prescribing the exercises of his patients, ordering some of them to walk eighty stadia in a day, which is about nine English miles.
John Arbuthnot.    
  3
 
  Injuries from friends fret and gall more, and the memory of them is not so easily obliterated.
John Arbuthnot.    
  4
 
  Health itself is but a kind of temper, gotten and preserved by a convenient mixture of contraries.
John Arbuthnot.    
  5
 
  Health consists in the equilibrium between those two powers, when the fluids move so equally that they don’t press upon the solids with a greater force than they can bear.
John Arbuthnot.    
  6
 
  The keeping insensible perspiration up in due measure is the cause as well as sign of health, and the least deviation from that due quantity, the certain forerunner of a disease.
John Arbuthnot.    
  7
 
  Sadness, or great joy, equally dissipate the spirits, and immoderate exercise in hot air, with unquenched thirst.
John Arbuthnot.    
  8
 
  Law is a bottomless pit: John Bull was flattered by the lawyers that his suit would not last above a year; yet ten long years did Hocus steer his cause through all the meanders of the law, and all the courts.
John Arbuthnot.    
  9
 
  The Roman laws gave particular exemptions to such as built ships or traded in corn.
John Arbuthnot.    
  10
 
  Decent executions keep the world in awe: for that reason the majority of mankind ought to be hanged every year.
John Arbuthnot.    
  11
 
  She was in the due mean between one of your affected courtesying pieces of formality and your romps that have no regard to the common rules of civility.
John Arbuthnot.    
  12
 
  The first coin being made of brass gave the denomination to money among the Romans, and the whole turn of their expressions is derived from it.
John Arbuthnot.    
  13
 
  Hippocrates seldom mentions the doses of his medicines, which is somewhat surprising, because his purgatives are generally very rough and strong.
John Arbuthnot.    
  14
 
  Tickel’s first book does not want its merit; but I was disappointed in my expectation of a translation nicely true to the original; whereas in those parts where the greatest exactness seems to be demanded he has been the least careful.
John Arbuthnot.    
  15
 
 
 
  The instances of longevity are chiefly among the abstemious. Abstinence in extremity will prove a mortal disease; but the experiments of it are very rare.
John Arbuthnot: On Aliments.    
  16
 
  The mathematics are friends to religion, inasmuch as they charm the passions, restrain the impetuosity of imagination, and purge the mind from error and prejudice. Vice is error, confusion, and false reasoning; and all truth is more or less opposite to it. Besides, mathematical studies may serve for a pleasant entertainment for those hours which young men are apt to throw away upon their vices; the delightfulness of them being such as to make solitude not only easy but desirable.
John Arbuthnot: Usefulness of Mathematical Learning.    
  17
 
 
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