Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
William Camden
 
  Alterations of surnames have so intricated, or rather obscured, the truth of our pedigrees, that it will be no little hard labour to deduce them.
William Camden.    
  1
 
  Such patching maketh Littleton’s hotchpot of our tongue, and, in effect, brings the same rather to a Babellish confusion than any one entire language.
William Camden.    
  2
 
  Hitherto will our sparkful youth laugh at their great-grandfathers’ English, who had more care to do well than to speak minion-like.
William Camden.    
  3
 
  Our poets excel in grandity and gravity, in smoothness and property, in quickness and briefness.
William Camden.    
  4
 
  When substantialness combineth with delightfulness, and correctness with stayedness, how can the language sound otherwise than most full of sweetness?
William Camden.    
  5
 
  The effectual power of words the Pythagoreans extolled; the impious Jews ascribed all miracles to a name which was ingraved in the revestiary of the temple.
William Camden.    
  6
 
  Our English tongue is, I will not say as sacred as the Hebrew, or as learned as the Greek, but as fluent as the Latin, as courteous as the Spanish, as courtlike as the French, and as amorous as the Italian.
William Camden: Remains.    
  7
 
 
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