Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Bishop William Warburton
 
  The skilful disputant well knows that he never has his enemy at more advantage than when, by allowing the premises, he shows him arguing wrong from his own principles.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  1
 
  Shakspeare, in As You Like It, has rallied the mode of formal duelling, then so prevalent, with the highest humour and address.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  2
 
  Enthusiasm is that temper of mind in which the imagination has got the better of the judgment.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  3
 
  The protection of religion is indispensable to all governments.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  4
 
  The Egyptians, whose sages were not sedentary scholastic sophists, like the Grecian, but men employed and busied in the public affairs of religion and government.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  5
 
  A lie has no legs, and cannot stand; but it has wings, and can fly far and wide.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  6
 
  Persecution for opinions stuck the fastest, and, after having tarnished the splendour of almost every Protestant community in its turn, was the latest, and with most difficulty, shaken off.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  7
 
  Short isolated sentences were the mode in which ancient wisdom delighted to convey its precepts for the regulation of human conduct.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  8
 
  Reason is the test of ridicule,—not ridicule the test of truth.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  9
 
  Self-interest,… spurring to action by hopes and fears, caused all those disorders amongst men which required the remedy of civil society.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  10
 
  Of all literary exercitations, whether designed for the use or entertainment of the world, there are none of so much importance, or so immediately our concern, as those which let us into the knowledge of our own nature. Others may exercise the understanding or amuse the imagination; but these only can improve the heart and form the human mind to wisdom.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  11
 
  The Egyptians, by the concurrent testimony of antiquity, were amongst the first who taught that the soul was immortal.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  12
 
  The doctrine of a metempsychosis the Greek writers agree to have been first set abroad by the Egyptians.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  13
 
  The glare of puerile declamation that tinsels over the trite essays of the other.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  14
 
  The life of Tully and the Divine Legation will be a rule how men who esteem the love of each other should comfort themselves when they differ in opinion.
Bishop William Warburton.    
  15
 
 
 
  Good sense is the foundation of criticism; this it is that has made Dr. Bentley and Bp. Hare the two greatest that ever were in the world. Not that good sense alone will be sufficient. For that considerable part of it, emending a corrupt text, there must be a certain sagacity, which is so distinguishing a quality in Dr. Bentley.
Bishop William Warburton: To Dr. Birch; Nichols’s Lit. Anec., ii. 96.    
  16
 
 
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