Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Edmund Spenser
 
  They delight rather to lean to their old customs, though they be more unjust, and more inconvenient.
Edmund Spenser.    
  1
 
  Men’s apparel is commonly made according to their conditions, and often governed by their garments; for the person that is gowned is, by his gown, put in mind of gravity, and also restrained from lightness by the very unaptness of his weed.
Edmund Spenser.    
  2
 
  Many brave young minds have oftentimes, through hearing the praises and famous eulogies of worthy men, been stirred up to affect the like commendations, and so strive to the like deserts.
Edmund Spenser.    
  3
 
  Men when their actions succeed not as they would, are always ready to impute the blame thereof unto the heavens, so as to excuse their own follies.
Edmund Spenser.    
  4
 
  I have followed all the ancient poets historical: first, Homer, who in the person of Agamemnon ensampled a good governor and a virtuous man.
Edmund Spenser.    
  5
 
  It hath ever been the use of the conqueror to despise the language of the conquered, and to force him to learn his: so did the Romans always use, insomuch that there is no nation but is sprinkled with their language.
Edmund Spenser.    
  6
 
  Laws ought to be fashioned unto the manners and conditions of the people to whom they are meant, and not to be imposed upon them according to the simple rule of right.
Edmund Spenser.    
  7
 
  As it is in the nature of all men to love liberty, so they become flat libertines, and fall to all licentiousness.
Edmund Spenser.    
  8
 
  Many little esteem of their own lives, yet, for remorse of their wives and children, would be withheld.
Edmund Spenser.    
  9
 
  Guido has been rather too lavish in bestowing this beauty upon almost all his fine women.
Edmund Spenser.    
  10
 
  In all ages poets have been in special reputation, and methinks not without great cause; for besides their sweet inventions, and most witty lays, they have always used to set forth the praises of the good and virtuous.
Edmund Spenser.    
  11
 
  Some if they happen to hear an old word, albeit very natural and significant, cry out straightway that we speak no English, but gibberish.
Edmund Spenser.    
  12
 
  If any one will rashly blame such his choice of old and unwonted words, him may I more justly blame and condemn, either of witless headiness in judging, or of headless hardiness in condemning.
Edmund Spenser.    
  13
 
  The Lacedemonians were more excited to desire of honour with the excellent verses of the poet Tirtæus than with all the exhortations of their captains.
Edmund Spenser: Ireland.    
  14
 
  The child taketh most of his nature of the mother, besides speech, manners, and inclination, which are agreeable to the conditions of their mothers.
Edmund Spenser: On Ireland.    
  15
 
 
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