Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Sir Philip Sidney
 
  Who shoots at the mid-day sun, though he be sure he shall never hit the mark, yet as sure he is he shall shoot higher than he who aims but at a bush.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  1
 
  I am no herald to inquire into men’s pedigree; it sufficeth me if I know their virtues.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  2
 
  What is birth to man if it shall be a stain to his dead ancestors to have left such an offspring?
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  3
 
  There is nothing sooner overthrows a weak head than opinion of authority; like too strong a liquor for a frail glass.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  4
 
  An evil mind in authority doth not follow the sway of the desires already within it, but frames to itself new diseases not before thought of.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  5
 
  Beauty and use can so well agree together that of all the trinkets wherewith they are attired there is not one but serves to some necessary purpose.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  6
 
  There is no man at once either excellently good or extremely evil, but grows either as he holds himself up in virtue or lets himself slide to viciousness.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  7
 
  Confidence in one’s self is the chief nurse of magnanimity; which confidence, notwithstanding, doth not leave the care of necessary furniture for it; and therefore, of all the Grecians, Homer doth ever make Achilles the best armed.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  8
 
  I seek no better warrant than my own conscience, nor no greater pleasure than mine own contentation.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  9
 
  The highest point outward things can bring one unto is the contentment of the mind, with which no estate is miserable.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  10
 
  It many times falls out that we deem ourselves much deceived in others, because we first deceived ourselves.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  11
 
  Another will say it [the English tongue] wanteth grammar. Nay, truly, it hath that praise, that it wants not grammar; for grammar it might have, but needs it not.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  12
 
  He was strong of body, and so much the stronger as he, by a well-disciplined exercise, taught it both to do and suffer.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  13
 
  You will never live to my age without you keep yourself in breath with exercise.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  14
 
  All is but lip-wisdom which wants experience.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  15
 
 
 
  Fear is far more painful to cowardice than death to true courage.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  16
 
  The most servile flattery is lodged the most easily in the grossest capacity; for their ordinary conceit draweth a yielding to their greaters, and then have they not wit to discern the right degree of duty.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  17
 
  The lightsome countenance of a friend giveth such an inward decking to the house where it lodgeth, as proudest palaces have cause to envy the gilding.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  18
 
  Doing good is the only certainly happy action of a man’s life.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  19
 
  The worst kind of oligarchy is, when men are governed indeed by a few, and yet are not taught to know what those few be whom they should obey.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  20
 
  Homer never entertained either guests or hosts with long speeches till the mouth of hunger be stopped.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  21
 
  Carrying thus in one person the only two bands of good-will, loveliness and lovingness.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  22
 
  Love is better than spectacles to make everything seem great.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  23
 
  The Greeks named the poet [Greek], which name, as the most excellent, hath gone through other languages. It cometh of this word [Greek], to make; wherein, I know not whether by luck or wisdom, we Englishmen have met with the Greeks in calling him a maker.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  24
 
  I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  25
 
  In forming a judgment, lay your hearts void of fore-taken opinions; else, whatsoever is done or said will be measured by a wrong rule; like them who have the jaundice, to whom everything appeareth yellow.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  26
 
  It is manifest that all government of action is to be gotten by knowledge, and knowledge, best, by gathering many knowledges, which is Reading.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  27
 
  Reason cannot show itself more reasonable than to leave reasoning on things above reason.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  28
 
  The violence of sorrow is not at the first to be striven withal; being, like a mighty beast, sooner tamed with following than overthrown by withstanding.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  29
 
  I willingly confess that it likes me better when I find virtue in a fair lodging than when I am bound to seek it in an ill-favoured creature.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  30
 
  What doth better become wisdom than to discern what is worthy the living?
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  31
 
  As the love of heaven makes one heavenly, the love of virtue virtuous, so doth the love of the world make one become worldly.
Sir Philip Sidney.    
  32
 
 
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