Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
John Ray
 
  We highly esteem and stand much upon our birth, though we derive nothing from our ancestors but our bodies; and it is useful to improve this advantage, to imitate their good examples.
John Ray.    
  1
 
  There is no greater, at least no more palpable and convincing, argument of the existence of a Deity than the admirable art and wisdom that discovers itself in the make and constitution, the order and disposition, the ends and uses, of all the parts and members of this stately fabric of heaven and earth. For if in the works of art, as for example a curious edifice or machine, counsel, design, and direction to an end, appearing in the whole frame, and in all the several pieces of it, do necessarily infer the being and operation of some intelligent architect or engineer, why shall not also in the works of nature, that grandeur and magnificence, that excellent contrivance for beauty, order, use, etc., which is observable in them, wherein they do as much transcend the effects of human art as infinite power and wisdom exceeds finite, infer the existence and efficiency of an Omnipotent and All-wise Creator?
John Ray.    
  2
 
  A wonder it must be that there should be any man found so stupid as to persuade himself that this most beautiful world could be produced by the fortuitous concourse of atoms.
John Ray.    
  3
 
  Should he find upon one single sheet of parchment an oration written full of profound sense, adorned with elegant phrase, the wit of man could not persuade him that this was done by the temerarious dashes of an unguided pen.
John Ray.    
  4
 
  It is more worthy of the Deity to attribute the creation of the world to the exundation and overflowing of his transcendent and infinite goodness.
John Ray.    
  5
 
  The heart is the first part that quickens, and the last that dies.
John Ray.    
  6
 
  The aqueous humour of the eye will not freeze, which is very admirable, seeing it hath a perspicuity and fluidity of common water.
John Ray.    
  7
 
  Humility in man consists not in denying any gift that is in him, but a just valuation of it; rather thinking too meanly than too highly.
John Ray.    
  8
 
  Every animal is providentially directed to the use of its proper weapons.
John Ray.    
  9
 
  To call God to witness truth, or a lie perhaps; or to appeal to him on every trivial occasion, in common discourse, customarily without consideration, is one of the highest indignities and affronts that can be offered him.
John Ray.    
  10
 
  Flattering of others, and boasting of ourselves, may be referred to lying: the one to please others, and puff them up with self-conceit; the other to gain more honour than is due to ourselves.
John Ray.    
  11
 
  These nobler faculties of the mind, matter organized could never produce.
John Ray.    
  12
 
  Our senses, however armed or assisted, are too gross to discern the curiosity of the workmanship of nature.
John Ray.    
  13
 
  For the cure of this disease an humble, serious, hearty repentance is the only physic; not to expiate the guilt of it, but to qualify us to partake of the benefit of Christ’s atonement.
John Ray.    
  14
 
  How a man can have a quiet and cheerful mind under a great burden and load of guilt, I know not, unless he be very ignorant.
John Ray.    
  15
 
 
 
  A talkative person runs himself upon great inconveniences by blabbing out his own or others’ secrets.
John Ray.    
  16
 
  Why loquacity is to be avoided the wise man gives us a sufficient answer, Prov. x. 19: “In the multitude of words there wanteth not sin:” and Eccl. v. 7: “In many words there are divers vanities.”
John Ray.    
  17
 
  It may be part of our employment in eternity to contemplate the works of God, and give him the glory of his wisdom manifested in the creation.
John Ray: On Creation.    
  18
 
  He that with this Christian armour manfully fights against and repels the temptations and assaults of his spiritual enemies, he that keeps his conscience void of offence, shall enjoy peace here, and forever.
John Ray: On Creation.    
  19
 
  No better cosmetics than a severe temperance and purity, modesty and humility, a gracious temper and calmness of spirit; no true beauty without the signature of these graces in the very countenance.
John Ray: On the Creation.    
  20
 
  So many kinds of creatures might be to exercise the contemplative faculty of man.
John Ray: On the Creation.    
  21
 
  One means very effectual for the preservation of health is a quiet and cheerful mind, not afflicted with violent passions or distracted with immoderate cares.
John Ray: On the Creation.    
  22
 
  He that uses many words for the explaining any subject, doth, like the cuttle-fish, hide himself for the most part in his own ink.
John Ray: On the Creation.    
  23
 
  Let us then consider the works of God, and observe the operations of his hands: let us take notice of and admire his infinite wisdom and goodness in the formation of them. No creature in this sublunary world is capable of so doing beside man; yet we are deficient herein: we content ourselves with the knowledge of the tongues, and a little skill in philology, or history perhaps, and antiquity, and neglect that which to me seems more material.—I mean natural history and the works of the creation.
John Ray: The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation.    
  24
 
  I persuade myself that the bountiful and gracious Author of man’s being and faculties, and all things else, delights in the beauty of his creation, and is well pleased with the industry of man in adorning the earth with beautiful cities and castles, with pleasant villages and country houses, with regular gardens and orchards, and plantations of all sorts of shrubs, and herbs, and fruits, for meat, medicine, or moderate delight; with shady woods and groves, and walks set with rows of elegant trees; with pastures clothed with flocks, and valleys covered over with corn, and meadows burthened with grass, and whatever else differenceth a civil and well-cultivated region from a barren and desolate wilderness.
John Ray: The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation.    
  25
 
 
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