Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Matthew Prior
 
  An author is in the condition of a culprit; the public are his judges: by allowing too much, and condescending too far, he may injure his own cause; and by pleading and asserting too boldly he may displease the court.
Matthew Prior.    
  1
 
  Homer’s Achilles is haughty and passionate, impatient of any restraint by laws, and arrogant in arms.
Matthew Prior.    
  2
 
  In his Odyssey, Homer explains that the hardest difficulties may be overcome by labour, and our fortune restored after the severest afflictions.
Matthew Prior.    
  3
 
  Poets are allowed the same liberty in their descriptions and comparisons as painters in their draperies and ornaments.
Matthew Prior.    
  4
 
  By cutting off the sense at the end of every first line, which must always rhyme to the next following, is produced too frequent an identity in sound, and brings every couplet to the point of an epigram.
Matthew Prior.    
  5
 
 
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