Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Montesquieu
 
  False happiness renders men stern and proud, and that happiness is never communicated. True happiness renders them kind and sensible, and that happiness is always shared.
Montesquieu.    
  1
 
  A prince who loves and fears religion is a lion who stoops to the hand that strokes, or to the voice that appeases him. He who fears and hates religion is like the savage beast that growls and bites the chain which prevents his flying on the passenger. He who has no religion at all is that terrible animal who perceives his liberty only when he tears to pieces and when he devours.
Montesquieu.    
  2
 
  All beings have their laws; the Deity has his laws, the material world has its laws, superior intelligences have their laws, the beasts have their laws, and man has his laws.
Montesquieu.    
  3
 
  I never listen to calumnies, because, if they are untrue, I run the risk of being deceived, and if they be true, of hating persons not worth thinking about.
Montesquieu.    
  4
 
 
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