Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Richard Baxter
 
  I must confess, as the experience of my own soul, that the expectation of loving my friends in heaven principally kindles my love to them while on earth. If I thought I should never know, and consequently never love, them after this life, I should number them with temporal things, and love them as such; but I now delightfully converse with my pious friends in a firm persuasion that I shall converse with them forever; and I take comfort in those that are dead or absent, believing that I shall shortly meet them in heaven and love them with a heavenly love.
Richard Baxter.    
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  Idleness is a constant sin, and labour is a duty. Idleness is but the devil’s home for temptation, and unprofitable, distracting musings.
Richard Baxter.    
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  Frequency in heavenly contemplation is particularly important to prevent a shyness between God and thy soul.
Richard Baxter.    
  3
 
  Though selfishness hath defiled the whole man, yet sensual pleasure is the chief part of its interest, and therefore by the senses it commonly works; and these are the doors and the windows by which iniquity entereth into the soul.
Richard Baxter.    
  4
 
  Use sin as it will use you; spare it not, for it will not spare you: it is your murderer, and the murderer of the world: use it, therefore, as a murderer should be used. Kill it before it kills you; and though it kill your bodies, it shall not be able to kill your souls; and though it bring you to the grave, as it did your Head, it shall not be able to keep you there.
Richard Baxter.    
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  God takes men’s hearty desires and will, instead of the deed, when they have not power to fulfil it; but he never took the bare deed instead of the will.
Richard Baxter.    
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  The prodigious lies which have been published in this age in matters of fact, with unblushing confidence, even where thousands or multitudes of eye and ear witnesses knew all to be false, doth call men to take heed what history they believe, especially where power and violence affordeth that privilege to the reporter that no man dare answer him, or detect his fraud; or, if they do, their writings are all supprest. As long as men have liberty to examine and contradict one another, one may partly conjecture, by comparing their words, on which side the truth is like to lie. But when great men write history, or flatterers by their appointment, which no man dare contradict, believe it but as you are constrained.
Richard Baxter: Reliquiæ Baxterianæ.    
  7
 
 
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