Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld
 
  Absence destroys trifling intimacies, but it invigorates strong ones.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  1
 
  We may say of agreeableness, as distinct from beauty, that it consists in a symmetry of which we know not the rules, and a secret conformity of the features to each other, and to the air and complexion of the person.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  2
 
  Grace is to the body what good sense is to the mind.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  3
 
  The humours of the body have a stated and a regular course, which impels and imperceptibly guides our will. They co-operate with each other, and exercise successively a secret empire within us; so that they have a considerable part in all our actions, without our being able to know it. Hence the necessity of attention to our bodily health.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  4
 
  Preserving the health by too strict a regimen is a wearisome malady.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  5
 
  There are more faults in the humour than in the mind.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  6
 
  Hypocrisy is the homage that vice pays to virtue.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  7
 
  We seldom find people ungrateful as long as we are in a condition to render them services.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  8
 
  Love, like fire, cannot subsist without continual movement: so soon as it ceases to hope and fear, it ceases to exist.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  9
 
  Nothing so much prevents our being natural as the desire of appearing so.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  10
 
  Narrowness of mind is often the cause of obstinacy: we do not easily believe beyond what we see.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  11
 
  Philosophy can hold an easy triumph over the misfortunes which are past and to come; but those which are present triumph over her. By philosophy we are taught to dismiss our regrets for the past and our apprehensions of future evils; but the immediate sense of suffering she cannot teach us to subdue.
François, duc de La Rochefoucauld.    
  12
 
 
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