Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Mrs. Jameson
 
  Duty is far more than love. It is the upholding law through which the weakest become strong, without which all strength is unstable as water. No character, however harmoniously framed and gloriously gifted, can be complete without this abiding principle: it is the cement which binds the whole moral edifice together, without which all power, goodness, intellect, truth, happiness, love itself, can have no permanence; but all the fabric of existence crumbles away from under us, and leaves us at last sitting in the midst of a ruin,—astonished at our own desolation.
Mrs. Jameson.    
  1
 
  In morals, what begins in fear usually ends in wickedness; in religion, what begins in fear usually ends in fanaticism. Fear, either as a principle or a motive, is the beginning of all evil.
Mrs. Jameson.    
  2
 
  Blessed is the memory of those who have kept themselves unspotted from the world! Yet more blessed and more the memory of those who have kept themselves unspotted in the world!
Mrs. Jameson.    
  3
 
 
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