Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Richard Hooker
 
  The ways of well-doing are in number even as many as are the kinds of voluntary actions: so that whatsoever we do in this world, and may do it ill, we show ourselves therein by well-doing to be wise.
Richard Hooker.    
  1
 
  Many men there are than whom nothing is more commendable when they are singled; and yet, in society with others, none less fit to answer the duties which are looked for at their hands.
Richard Hooker.    
  2
 
  Concerning deliverance itself from all adversity we use not to say, “Men are in adversity,” whensoever they feel any small hindrance of their welfare in this world; but when some notable affliction or cross, some great calamity or trouble, befalleth them.
Richard Hooker.    
  3
 
  Be it never so true which we teach the world to believe, yet if once their affections begin to be alienated a small thing persuadeth them to change their opinions.
Richard Hooker.    
  4
 
  The minds of the afflicted do never think they have fully conceived the weight or measure of their own woe: they use their affection as a whetstone both to wit and memory.
Richard Hooker.    
  5
 
  Wisdom and youth are seldom joined in one; and the ordinary course of the world is more according to Job’s observation, who giveth men advice to seek wisdom among the ancients, and in the length of days understanding.
Richard Hooker.    
  6
 
  The love of things ancient doth argue stayedness, but levity and want of experience maketh apt unto innovation.
Richard Hooker.    
  7
 
  Many times that which deserveth approbation would hardly find favour if they which propose it were not to profess themselves scholars, and followers of the ancients.
Richard Hooker.    
  8
 
  Angels are spirits immaterial and intellectual, the glorious inhabitants of those sacred palaces where there is nothing but light and immortality; no shadow of matter for tears, discontentments, griefs, and uncomfortable passions to work upon; but all joy, tranquillity, and peace, even forever and ever, do dwell.
Richard Hooker.    
  9
 
  They that are more fervent to dispute be not always the most able to determine.
Richard Hooker.    
  10
 
  Our endeavour is not so much to overthrow them with whom we contend, as to yield them just and reasonable causes of those things which, for want of due consideration heretofore, they misconceived.
Richard Hooker.    
  11
 
  As for probabilities, what thing was there ever set down so agreeable with sound reason but some probable show against it might be made?
Richard Hooker.    
  12
 
  By a man’s authority we are to understand the force which his word hath for the assurance of another’s mind that buildeth on it.
Richard Hooker.    
  13
 
  For men to be tied, and led by authority, as it were with a kind of captivity of judgment; and though there be reason to the contrary, not to listen unto it.
Richard Hooker.    
  14
 
  Number may serve your purpose with the ignorant, who measure by tale, and not by weight.
Richard Hooker.    
  15
 
 
 
  The reason why the simpler sort are moved with authority, is the conscience of their own ignorance.
Richard Hooker.    
  16
 
  With whom ordinary means will prevail, surely the power of the word of God, even without the help of interpreters, in God’s church worketh mightily, not unto their confirmation alone which are converted, but also to their conversion which are not.
Richard Hooker.    
  17
 
  Unto the word of God, being, in respect of that end for which God ordained it, perfect, exact, and absolute in itself, we do not add reason as a supplement of any maim or defect therein, but as a necessary instrument, without which we could not reap by the Scripture’s perfection that fruit and benefit which it yieldeth.
Richard Hooker.    
  18
 
  The reading of Scripture is effectual, as well to lay even the first foundation, as to add degrees of farther perfection, in the fear of God.
Richard Hooker.    
  19
 
  The little which some of the heathen did chance to hear concerning such matter as the sacred Scripture plentifully containeth, they did in wonderful sort effect.
Richard Hooker.    
  20
 
  Let this be granted, and it shall hereupon plainly ensue that the light of Scripture once shining in the world, all other light of nature is therewith in such sort drowned that now we need it not.
Richard Hooker.    
  21
 
  All those venerable books of Scripture, all those sacred tomes and volumes of holy writ, are with such absolute perfection framed.
Richard Hooker.    
  22
 
  The Scripture must be sufficient to imprint in us the character of all things necessary for the attainment of eternal life.
Richard Hooker.    
  23
 
  The Scripture of God is a storehouse abounding with inestimable treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
Richard Hooker.    
  24
 
  As well for particular application to special occasions, as also in other manifold respects, infinite treasures of wisdom are abundantly to be found in the Holy Scriptures.
Richard Hooker.    
  25
 
  Whatsoever to make up the doctrine of man’s salvation is added as in supply of the Scripture’s insufficiency, we reject it.
Richard Hooker.    
  26
 
  The choice and flower of all things profitable in other books, the Psalms do both more briefly contain, and more movingly also express, by reason of that poetical form wherewith they are written.
Richard Hooker.    
  27
 
  Every effect doth after a sort contain, at leastwise resemble, the cause from which it proceedeth.
Richard Hooker.    
  28
 
  The wise and learned amongst the very heathens themselves have all acknowledged some first cause whereupon originally the being of all things dependeth; neither have they otherwise spoken of that cause than as an agent, which knowing what and why it worketh, observeth in working a most exact order or law.
Richard Hooker.    
  29
 
  He that exhorteth to beware of an enemy’s policy doth not give counsel to be impolitic; but rather to use all prudent foresight and circumspection lest our simplicity be over-reached by cunning slights.
Richard Hooker.    
  30
 
  By ascending, after that the sharpness of death was overcome, he took the very local possession of glory, and that to the use of all that are his, even as himself before had witnessed, I go to prepare a place for you.
Richard Hooker.    
  31
 
  There are two kinds of Christian righteousness; the one without us, which we have by imputation; the other in us, which consisteth of faith, hope, and charity, and other Christian virtues.
Richard Hooker.    
  32
 
  In every grand or main public duty which God requireth of his church, there is, besides that matter and form wherein the essence thereof consisteth, a certain outward fashion, whereby the same is in decent manner administered.
Richard Hooker.    
  33
 
  The service of God in the solemn assembly of the saints is a work, though easy, yet withal very weighty, and of great respect.
Richard Hooker.    
  34
 
  Then are the public duties of religion best ordered when the militant church doth resemble by sensible means that hidden dignity and glory wherewith the church triumphant in heaven is beautified.
Richard Hooker.    
  35
 
  Churches have names; some as memorials of peace, some of wisdom, some in memory of the Trinity itself, some of Christ under sundry titles; of the blessed Virgin not a few; many of one apostle, saint, or martyr; many of all.
Richard Hooker.    
  36
 
  Antiquity, custom, and consent, in the church of God, making with that which law doth establish, are themselves most sufficient reasons to uphold the same, unless some notable public inconvenience enforce the contrary.
Richard Hooker.    
  37
 
  That which should make for them must prove that men ought not to make laws for church regiment, but only keep those laws which in Scripture they find made.
Richard Hooker.    
  38
 
  Christ could not suffer that the temple should serve for a place of mart, nor the apostle of Christ that the church should be made an inn.
Richard Hooker.    
  39
 
  Manifest it is, that the very majesty and holiness of the place where God is worshipped hath, in regard to us, great virtue, force, and efficacy; for that it serveth as a sensible help to stir up devotion.
Richard Hooker.    
  40
 
  When neither the evidence of any law divine, nor the strength of any invincible argument otherwise found out by the law of reason, nor any notable public inconvenience, doth make against that which our own laws ecclesiastical have instituted for the ordering of these affairs, the very authority of the church itself sufficeth.
Richard Hooker.    
  41
 
  It is no more disgrace to Scripture to have left things free to be ordered by the church, than for Nature to have left it to the wit of man to devise his own attire.
Richard Hooker.    
  42
 
  Everywhere throughout all generations and ages of the Christian world no church ever perceived the Word of God to be against it.
Richard Hooker.    
  43
 
  We hold that God’s clergy are a state which hath been, and will be as long as there is a church upon earth, necessary, by the plain word of God himself: a state whereunto the rest of God’s people must be subject as touching things that appertain to their souls’ health.
Richard Hooker.    
  44
 
  It cannot enter any man’s conceit to think it lawful that every man which listeth should take upon him charge in the church; and therefore a solemn admittance is of such necessity that without it there can be no church polity.
Richard Hooker.    
  45
 
  Let it therefore be required, on both parts, at the hands of the clergy, to be in meanness of estate like the apostles; at the hands of the laity, to be as they who lived under the apostles.
Richard Hooker.    
  46
 
  I have endeavoured, throughout this discourse, that every former part might give strength unto all that follow, and every latter bring some light unto all before.
Richard Hooker.    
  47
 
  Sith evils, great and unexpected, doth cause oftentimes even them to think upon divine power with fearfullest suspicions, which have been otherwise the most sacred adorers thereof; how should we look for any constant resolution of mind in such cases, saving only where unfeigned affection to God hath bred the most assured confidence to be assisted by his hand?
Richard Hooker.    
  48
 
  Every man’s heart and conscience doth in good or evil, even secretly committed, and known to none but itself, either like or disallow itself.
Richard Hooker.    
  49
 
  Because conscience, and the fear of swerving from that which is right, maketh them diligent observers of circumstances, the loose regard whereof is the nurse of vulgar folly.
Richard Hooker.    
  50
 
  Man doth not seem to rest satisfied either with fruition of that wherewith his life is preserved, or with performance of such actions as advance him most deservedly in estimation.
Richard Hooker.    
  51
 
  When the best things are not possible, the best may be made of those that are.
Richard Hooker.    
  52
 
  Suspense of judgment and exercise of charity were safer and seemlier for Christian men than the hot pursuit of these controversies.
Richard Hooker.    
  53
 
  Till some admirable or unusual accident happens, as it hath in some, to work the beginning of a better alteration in the mind, disputation about the knowledge of God commonly prevaileth little.
Richard Hooker.    
  54
 
  That which wisdom did first begin, and hath been with good men long continued, challengeth allowance of them that succeed, although it plead for itself nothing.
Richard Hooker.    
  55
 
  The custom of evil makes the heart obdurate against whatsoever instructions to the contrary.
Richard Hooker.    
  56
 
  Men will not bend their wits to examine whether things wherewith they have been accustomed be good or evil.
Richard Hooker.    
  57
 
  That which causeth bitterness in death is the languishing attendance and expectation of it ere it come.
Richard Hooker.    
  58
 
  A virtuous mind should rather wish to depart this world with a kind of treatable resolution than to be suddenly cut off in a moment; rather to be taken than snatched away from the face of the earth.
Richard Hooker.    
  59
 
  Have wisdom to provide always beforehand, that those evils overtake us not which death unexpected doth use to bring upon careless men; and although it be sudden in itself, nevertheless, in regard of the prepared minds, it may not be sudden.
Richard Hooker.    
  60
 
  Let us beg of God that, when the hour of our rest is come, the patterns of our dissolution may be Jacob, Moses, Joshua, and David, who, leisurably ending their lives in peace, prayed for the mercies of God upon their posterity.
Richard Hooker.    
  61
 
  Man doth not seem to rest satisfied either with fruition of that wherewith his life is preserved, or with performance of such actions as advance him most deservedly in estimation.
Richard Hooker.    
  62
 
  It is a matter of sound consequence, that all duties are by so much the better performed by how much the men are more religious from whose habitudes the same proceed.
Richard Hooker.    
  63
 
  Education and instruction are the means, the one by use, the other by precept, to make our natural faculty of reason both the better and the sooner to judge rightly between truth and error, good and evil.
Richard Hooker.    
  64
 
  Every error is a stain to the beauty of nature, for which cause it blusheth thereat, but glorieth in the contrary.
Richard Hooker.    
  65
 
  The cause of error is ignorance what restraints and limitations all principles have in regard of the matter whereunto they are applicable.
Richard Hooker.    
  66
 
  When men’s affections do frame their opinions, they are in defence of error more earnest, a great deal, than, for the most part, sound believers in the maintenance of truth, apprehending according to the nature of that evidence which scripture yieldeth.
Richard Hooker.    
  67
 
  Now for the most part it so falleth out, touching things which generally are received, that although in themselves they be most certain, yet, because men presume them granted of all, we are hardliest able to bring proof of their certainty.
Richard Hooker.    
  68
 
  Every cause admitteth not such infallible evidence of proof as leaveth no possibility of doubt or scruple behind it.
Richard Hooker.    
  69
 
  Sometimes the very custom of evil makes the heart obdurate against whatsoever instructions to the contrary.
Richard Hooker.    
  70
 
  Of divers things evil, all being not evitable, we take one; which one, saving only in case of so great urgency, were not otherwise to betaken.
Richard Hooker.    
  71
 
  We had rather follow the perfections of them whom we like not than in defects resemble them whom we love.
Richard Hooker.    
  72
 
  Not that God doth require nothing unto happiness at the hands of men saving only a naked belief,… but that without belief all other things are as nothing.
Richard Hooker.    
  73
 
  As our fear excludeth not that boldness which becometh saints, so if our familiarity with God do not savour of fear, it draweth too near that irreverent confidence wherewith true humility can never stand.
Richard Hooker.    
  74
 
  Many never think on God but in extremity of fear, and then, perplexity not suffering them to be idle, they think and do as it were in a phrenzy.
Richard Hooker.    
  75
 
  We owe obedience to the law of reason, which teacheth mediocrity in meats and drinks.
Richard Hooker.    
  76
 
  Conscience, and the fear of swerving from that which is right, maketh them diligent observers of circumstances, the loose regard of which is the nurse of vulgar folly.
Richard Hooker.    
  77
 
  Some things are done by men, though not through outward force and impulsion, though not against, yet without, their wills; as in alienation of mind, or any like inevitable utter absence of wit and judgment.
Richard Hooker.    
  78
 
  God alone excepted; who actually and everlastingly is whatsoever he may be; and which cannot hereafter be that which now he is not: all other things besides are somewhat in possibility which as yet they are not in act.
Richard Hooker.    
  79
 
  God hath his influence into the very essence of all things, without which influence of Deity supporting them, their utter annihilation could not choose but follow.
Richard Hooker.    
  80
 
  That which moveth God to work is goodness, and that which ordereth his work is wisdom, and that which perfecteth his work is power.
Richard Hooker.    
  81
 
  The better, the more desirable: that therefore must be desirable wherein there is infinity of goodness; so that if anything desirable may be infinite, that must needs be the highest of all things that are desired: no good is infinite but only God, therefore he is our felicity and bliss.
Richard Hooker.    
  82
 
  Whom although to know be life, and joy to make mention of his name; yet our soundest knowledge is to know that we know him not as indeed he is, neither can know him; and our safest eloquence concerning him is silence.
Richard Hooker.    
  83
 
  As teaching bringeth us to know that God is our supreme truth, so prayer testifieth that we acknowledge him our supreme good.
Richard Hooker.    
  84
 
  God, of his great liberality, had determined, in lieu of man’s endeavours, to bestow the same by the rule of that justice which best beseemeth him.
Richard Hooker.    
  85
 
  Some things are good, yet in so mean a degree of goodness that many are only not disproved nor disallowed of God for them.
Richard Hooker.    
  86
 
  The labour of doing good, with the pleasure arising from the contrary, doth make men for the most part slower to the one and proner to the other than that duty, prescribed them by law, can prevail sufficiently with them.
Richard Hooker.    
  87
 
  The rule of voluntary agents on earth is the sentence that reason giveth concerning the goodness of those things which they are to do.
Richard Hooker.    
  88
 
  The most certain token of evident goodness is, if the general persuasion of all men does so account it.
Richard Hooker.    
  89
 
  Though there be a kind of natural right in the noble, wise, and virtuous, to govern them which are of a servile disposition; nevertheless, for manifestation of this their right the assent of them who are to be governed seemeth necessary.
Richard Hooker.    
  90
 
  The greatness of all actions is measured by the worthiness of the subject from which they proceed, and the object whereabout they are conversant: we must of necessity, in both respects, acknowledge that this present world affordeth not anything comparable unto the duties of religion.
Richard Hooker.    
  91
 
  Happiness is that estate whereby we attain, so far as possibly may be attained, the full possession of that which simply for itself is to be desired, and containeth in it after an eminent sort the contentation of our desires, the highest degree of all our perfection.
Richard Hooker.    
  92
 
  All things subject to action the will does so far incline unto as reason judges them more available to our bliss.
Richard Hooker.    
  93
 
  There are many graces for which we may not cease hourly to sue, graces which are in bestowing always, but never come to be fully had in this present life; and therefore, when all things here have an end, endless thanks must have their beginning in a state which bringeth the full and final satisfaction of all such perpetual desires.
Richard Hooker.    
  94
 
  It is of things heavenly an universal declaration, working in them whose hearts God inspireth with the due consideration thereof, an habit or disposition of mind whereby they are made fit vessels both for the receipt and delivery of whatsoever spiritual perfection.
Richard Hooker.    
  95
 
  Hope beginneth here with a trembling expectation of things far removed, and as yet but only heard of.
Richard Hooker.    
  96
 
  Is it not wonderful that base desires should so extinguish in men the sense of their own excellence as to make them willing that their souls should be like the souls of beasts, mortal and corruptible with their bodies?
Richard Hooker.    
  97
 
  While they study how to bring to pass that religion may seem but a matter made, they lose themselves in the very maze of their own discourses, as if reason did even purposely forsake them who of purpose forsake God, the author thereof.
Richard Hooker.    
  98
 
  The main principles of reason are in themselves apparent. For to make nothing evident of itself unto man’s understanding were to take away all possibility of knowing anything.
Richard Hooker.    
  99
 
  It is a kind of taking God’s name in vain to debase religion with such frivolous disputes.
Richard Hooker.    
  100
 
  If they which employ their labour and travail about the public administration of justice, follow it only as a trade, with unquenchable thirst of gain, being not in heart persuaded that justice is God’s own work, and themselves his agents in this business,—the sentence of right, God’s own verdict, and themselves his priests to deliver it; formalities of justice do but serve to smother right; and that which was necessarily ordained for the common good is, through shameful abuse, made the cause of common misery.
Richard Hooker.    
  101
 
  If there might be added true art and learning, there would be as much difference in maturity of judgment between men therewith inured, and that which now men are, as between men that are now and innocents.
Richard Hooker.    
  102
 
  With gross and popular capacities nothing doth more prevail than unlimited generalities, because of their plainness at the first sight; nothing less, with men of exact judgment, because such rules are not safe to be trusted over far.
Richard Hooker.    
  103
 
  There will come a time when three words uttered with charity and meekness shall receive a far more blessed reward than three thousand volumes written with disdainful sharpness of wit. But the manner of men’s writing must not alienate our heart from the truth, if it appear they have the truth.
Richard Hooker.    
  104
 
  For a spur of diligence, we have a natural thirst after knowledge ingrafted in us.
Richard Hooker.    
  105
 
  Knowledge imparteth in the minds of all men, whereby both general principles for directing of human actions are comprehended, and conclusions derived from them, upon which conclusions groweth, in particularity, the choice of good and evil.
Richard Hooker.    
  106
 
  All kinds of knowledge have their certain bounds; each of them presupposeth many things learned in other sciences and known beforehand.
Richard Hooker.    
  107
 
  To trust to labour without prayer argueth impiety and profaneness; it maketh light of the providence of God; and although it be not the intent of a religious mind, yet it is the fault of those men whose religion wanteth light of a mature judgment to direct it, when we join with our prayer slothfulness, and neglect of convenient labour.
Richard Hooker.    
  108
 
  That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure of working, the same we term a law.
Richard Hooker.    
  109
 
  The subject or matter of laws in general is thus far forth constant, which matter is that for the ordering whereof laws were instituted.
Richard Hooker.    
  110
 
  God hath delivered a law as sharp as the two-edged sword, piercing the very closest and most unsearchable corners of the heart, which the law of nature can hardly, human laws by no means, possibly reach unto.
Richard Hooker.    
  111
 
  As in Scripture a number of laws, particular and positive, being in force, may not by any law of man be violated, we are, in making laws, to have thereunto an especial eye.
Richard Hooker.    
  112
 
  The Jews, who had laws so particularly determining in all affairs what to do, were notwithstanding continually inured with causes exorbitant, and such as their laws had not provided for.
Richard Hooker.    
  113
 
  Laws, as all other things human, are many times full of imperfection; and that which supposed behoveful unto men proveth oftentimes most pernicious.
Richard Hooker.    
  114
 
  There is not any positive law of men, whether general or particular, received by formal express consent, as in councils, or by secret approbation, but the same may be taken away, if occasion serves.
Richard Hooker.    
  115
 
  Laws have been made upon special occasions; which occasions ceasing, laws of that kind do abrogate themselves.
Richard Hooker.    
  116
 
  When we abrogate a law as being ill made, the whole cause for which it was made still remaining, do we not herein revoke our very own deed, and upbraid ourselves with folly, yea, all that were makers of it with oversight and error?
Richard Hooker.    
  117
 
  Unto laws that men make for the benefit of men, it hath seemed always needful to add rewards which may more allure unto good than any hardness deterreth from it, and punishments which may more deter from evil than any sweetness thereto allureth.
Richard Hooker.    
  118
 
  The wisest are always the readiest to acknowledge that soundly to judge of a law is the weightiest thing which any man can take upon him.
Richard Hooker.    
  119
 
  A law there is among the Grecians, whereof Pittacus is author: that he which being overcome with drink did then strike any man should suffer punishment double as much as if he had done the same being sober.
Richard Hooker.    
  120
 
  Unto life many implements are necessary; more, if we seek such a life as hath in it joy, comfort, delight, and pleasure.
Richard Hooker.    
  121
 
  These things are linked and, as it were, chained one to another: we labour to eat, and we eat to live, and we live to do good; and the good which we do is as seed sown with reference unto a future harvest.
Richard Hooker.    
  122
 
  As the will doth now work upon that object by desire, which is motion towards the end, as yet unobtained; so likewise upon the same hereafter received, it shall work also by love.
Richard Hooker.    
  123
 
  Of those things which are for direction of all the parts of our life needful, and not impossible to be discerned by the light of nature itself, are there not many which few men’s natural capacity hath been able to find out?
Richard Hooker.    
  124
 
  In moral actions divine law helpeth exceedingly the law of reason to guide life, but in supernatural it alone guideth.
Richard Hooker.    
  125
 
  No man can attain belief by the bare contemplation of heaven and earth, for they neither are sufficient to give us as much as the least spark of light concerning the very principal mysteries of our faith.
Richard Hooker.    
  126
 
  The knowledge of that which a man is in reference unto himself and other things in relation unto man, I may term the mother of all those principles which are decrees in that law of nature; whereby human actions are framed.
Richard Hooker.    
  127
 
  Who the guide of nature, but only the God of nature? In him we live, move, and are. Those things which nature is said to do are by divine art performed, using nature as an instrument: nor is there any such knowledge divine in nature herself working, but in the guide of nature’s work.
Richard Hooker.    
  128
 
  If the passions of the mind be strong, they easily sophisticate the understanding; they make it apt to believe upon every slender warrant, and to imagine infallible truth when scarce any probable show appeareth.
Richard Hooker.    
  129
 
  If so were it possible that all other ornaments of mind might be had in their full perfection, nevertheless the mind that should possess them, divorced from piety could be but a spectacle of commiseration.
Richard Hooker.    
  130
 
  If the course of politic affairs cannot in any good course go forward without fit instruments, and that which fitteth them be their virtues, let polity acknowledge itself indebted to religion, godliness being the chiefest top and well-spring of all true virtues, even as God is of all good things.
Richard Hooker.    
  131
 
  It suiteth so fitly with that lightsome affection of joy wherein God delighteth when his saints praise him.
Richard Hooker.    
  132
 
  Prayer kindleth our desire to behold God by speculation, and the mind, delighted with that contemplative sight of God, taketh everywhere new inflammations to pray the riches of the mysteries of heavenly wisdom, continually stirring up in us correspondent desires towards them.
Richard Hooker.    
  133
 
  Himself not only comprehended all our necessities, but in such sort also framed every petition as might most naturally serve for many; and doth, though not always require, yet always import a multitude of speakers together.
Richard Hooker.    
  134
 
  They pray in vain to have sin pardoned, which seek not also to prevent sin by prayer, even every particular sin, by prayer against all sin; except men can name some transgressions wherewith we ought to have truce.
Richard Hooker.    
  135
 
  To propose our desires which cannot take such effect as we specify shall (notwithstanding) otherwise procure us his heavenly grace; even as this very prayer of Christ obtained angels to be sent him as comforters in his agony.
Richard Hooker.    
  136
 
  The knowledge is small which we have on earth concerning things that are done in heaven; notwithstanding, this much we know even of saints in heaven, that they pray.
Richard Hooker.    
  137
 
  For the instruction of all men to eternal life it is necessary that the sacred and saving truth of God be openly published unto them, which open publication of heavenly mysteries is by an excellency termed preaching.
Richard Hooker.    
  138
 
  What special property or quality is that, which being nowhere found but in sermons maketh them effectual to save souls, and leaveth all other doctrinal means besides destitute of vital efficacy?
Richard Hooker.    
  139
 
  As for probabilities, what thing was there ever set down so agreeable with sound reason but some probable show against it might be made?
Richard Hooker.    
  140
 
  Prosperity, in regard of our corrupt inclination to abuse the blessings of Almighty God, doth prove a thing dangerous to the souls of men.
Richard Hooker.    
  141
 
  Touching the law of reason, there are in it some things which stand as principles, universally agreed upon; and out of those principles, which are in themselves evident, the greatest moral duties we owe towards God or man may, without any great difficulty, be concluded.
Richard Hooker.    
  142
 
  Touching things which generally are received, although in themselves they be most certain, yet, because men presume them granted of all, we are hardliest able to bring such proof of their certainty as may satisfy gainsayers, when suddenly and besides expectation they require the same at our hands.
Richard Hooker.    
  143
 
  Nature worketh in us all a love to our own counsels: the contradiction of others is a fan to inflame that love.
Richard Hooker.    
  144
 
  Respective and wary men had rather seek quietly their own, and wish that the well may go well, so it be not long of them, than with pains and hazard make themselves advisers for the common good.
Richard Hooker.    
  145
 
  Although we cannot be free from all sin collectively, in such sort that no part thereof shall be found inherent in us; yet distributively at the least, all great and grievous actual offences, as they offer themselves one by one, both may and ought to be by all means avoided.
Richard Hooker.    
  146
 
  Aristotle speaketh of men whom nature hath framed for the state of servitude, saying, They have reason so far forth as to conceive when others direct them.
Richard Hooker.    
  147
 
  We are not, by ourselves, sufficient to furnish ourselves with competent stores for such a life as our nature doth desire; therefore we are naturally induced to seek communion and fellowship with others.
Richard Hooker.    
  148
 
  There are but a few, and they endued with great ripeness of wit and judgment, free from all such affairs as might trouble their meditations, instructed in the sharpest and subtlest points of learning, who have, and that very hardly, been able to find out but only the immortality of the soul.
Richard Hooker.    
  149
 
  The soul being, as it is active, perfected by love of that infinite good, shall, as it is receptive, be also perfected with those supernatural passions of joy, peace, and delight.
Richard Hooker.    
  150
 
  Two foundations bear up all public societies: the one, inclination whereby all men desire sociable life; the other an order agreed upon touching the manner of their union in living together: the latter is that which we call the law of a commonweal.
Richard Hooker.    
  151
 
  It is no impossible thing for states, by an oversight in some one act or treaty between them and their potent opposites, utterly to cast away themselves forever.
Richard Hooker.    
  152
 
  Things more secret than can be discerned by every man’s present conceit, without some deeper discourse and judgment.
Richard Hooker.    
  153
 
  All things religiously taken in hand are prosperously ended; because whether men in the end have that which religion did allow to desire, or that which it teacheth them contentedly to suffer, they are in neither event unfortunate.
Richard Hooker.    
  154
 
  Concerning the blessings of God, whether they tend unto this life or the life to come, there is great cause why we should delight more in giving thanks than in making requests for them, inasmuch as the one hath pensiveness and fear, the other always joy annexed.
Richard Hooker.    
  155
 
  Of translations the better I acknowledge that which cometh nearer to the very letter of the very original verity.
Richard Hooker.    
  156
 
  By the knowledge of truth, and exercise of virtue, man, amongst the creatures of this world, aspireth to the greatest conformity with God.
Richard Hooker.    
  157
 
  All true virtues are to honour true religion as their parent, and all well-ordered commonwealths to love her as their chiefest stay.
Richard Hooker.    
  158
 
  In the time of Severus and Antoninus, many, being soldiers, had been converted unto Christ, and notwithstanding continued still in that military course of life.
Richard Hooker.    
  159
 
  The will, properly and strictly taken, as it is (of things which are referred unto the end that man desireth) differeth greatly from inferior natural desire which we call appetite. The object of appetite is whatsoever sensible good may be wished for; the object of will is that good which reason does lead us to seek.
Richard Hooker.    
  160
 
  Rewards and punishments do always presuppose something willingly done, well or ill; without which respect, though we may sometimes receive good, yet then it is only a benefit, and not a reward.
Richard Hooker.    
  161
 
  Wisdom groundeth her laws upon an infallible rule of comparison.
Richard Hooker.    
  162
 
  Because the curiosity of man’s wit doth with peril wade farther in the search of things than were convenient, the same is thereby restrained unto such generalities as, everywhere offering themselves, are apparent to men of the weakest conceit.
Richard Hooker.    
  163
 
  Sharp and subtle discourses of wit procure many times very great applause, but being laid in the balance with that which the habit of sound experience delivereth, they are overweighed.
Richard Hooker.    
  164
 
  This so eminent industry in making proselytes more of that sex than of the other, groweth: for that they are deemed apter to serve as instruments in the cause. Apter they are through the eagerness of their affection; apter, through a natural inclination unto piety; apter, through sundry opportunities, &c. Finally, apter, through a singular delight which they take in giving very large and particular intelligence how all about near them stand affected as concerning the same cause.
Richard Hooker.    
  165
 
  There is nothing more dangerous than this deluding art which changeth the meaning of words as alchemy doth (or would do) the substance of metals; maketh of anything what it listeth, and bringeth, in the end, all truth to nothing.
Richard Hooker.    
  166
 
  To the best and wisest, while they live, the world is continually a froward opposite, a curious observer of their defects and imperfections: their virtues it afterwards as much admireth.
Richard Hooker.    
  167
 
  Good effects may grow in each of the people towards other, in them all towards their pastor, and in their pastor towards every of them; between whom there daily and interchangeably pass, in the hearing of God himself, and in the presence of his holy angels, so many heavenly acclamations, exultations, provocations, petitions.
Richard Hooker.    
  168
 
  There must be zeal, and fervency in him which proposeth for the rest those suits and supplications which they by their joyful acclamations, must ratify.
Richard Hooker.    
  169
 
  Zeal, unless it be rightly guided, when it endeavours the most busily to please God, forceth upon him those unseasonable offices which please him not.
Richard Hooker.    
  170
 
  General laws are like general rules in physic: according whereunto, as no wise man will desire himself to be cured, if there be joined with his disease some special accident; in regard whereof, that whereby others (in the same infirmity but without the like accident) recover health would be to him either hurtful, or at the least unprofitable.
Richard Hooker: Eccles. Pol., b. v. § 9.    
  171
 
  Affections (as joy, grief, fear, and anger, with such like), being, as it were, the sundry fashions and forms of appetite, can neither rise at the conceit of a thing indifferent, nor yet choose but rise at the sight of some things.
Richard Hooker: Eccles. Pol., Book I.    
  172
 
  Seeing, therefore, it doth thus appear that the safety of all states dependeth upon religion; that religion, unfeignedly loved, perfecteth men’s abilities unto all kinds of virtuous services in the commonwealth; that men’s desire is, in general, to hold no religion but the true; and that whatever good effects do grow out of their religion who embrace, instead of the true, a false, the roots thereof are certain sparks of the light of truth intermingled with the darkness of error,—because no religion can wholly and only consist of untruths,—we have reason to think that all true virtues are to honour true religion as their parent, and all well-ordered commonwealths to love her as their chiefest stay.
Richard Hooker: Eccles. Polity, ch. v.    
  173
 
  Of law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage,—the very least as feeling her care, the greatest as not exempted from her power: both angels and men and creatures, of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Richard Hooker: Ecclesiastical Polity.    
  174
 
 
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