Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Saint Augustine
 
  Bad company is like a nail driven into a post, which after the first or second blow may be drawn out with little difficulty; but being once driven up to the head, the pincers cannot take hold to draw it out, but which can only be done by the destruction of the wood.
Saint Augustine.    
  1
 
  God will not suffer man to have the knowledge of things to come: for if he had prescience of his prosperity, he would be careless; and understanding of his adversity, he would be senseless.
Saint Augustine.    
  2
 
  Drunkenness is a flattering devil, a sweet poison, a pleasant sin, which whosoever hath, hath not himself; which whosoever doth commit doth not commit sin, but he himself is wholly sin.
Saint Augustine.    
  3
 
 
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