Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Calamity
 
  Another ill accident is drought, and the spindling of the corn; insomuch as the word calamity was first derived from calamus [stalk] when the corn could not get out of the stalk.
Francis Bacon.    
  1
 
  For secret calumny, or the arrow flying in the dark, there is no public punishment left but what a good writer inflicts.
Alexander Pope.    
  2
 
  Of some calamity we can have no relief but from God alone; and what would men do in such a case, if it were not for God?
John Tillotson.    
  3
 
  Much more should the consideration of this pattern arm us with patience against ordinary calamities; especially if we consider His example with this advantage, that though His sufferings were wholly undeserved, and not for Himself but for us, yet He bore them patiently.
John Tillotson.    
  4
 
 
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