Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Severity
 
  Imperiousness and severity is but an ill way of treating men who have reason of their own to guide them.
John Locke.    
  1
 
  Severity carried to the highest pitch breaks the mind; and then in the place of a disorderly young fellow you have a low-spirited moped creature.
John Locke.    
  2
 
  Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion; and whatever any one is brought to by compulsion, he will leave as soon as he can.
John Locke.    
  3
 
  Recollect what disorder hasty or imperious words from parents or teachers have caused in his thoughts.
John Locke.    
  4
 
  Great severities do often work an effect quite contrary to that which was intended; and many times those who were bred up in a very severe school hate learning ever after for the sake of the cruelty that was used to force it upon them. So likewise an endeavour to bring children to piety and goodness by unreasonable strictness and rigour does often beget in them a lasting disgust and prejudice against religion, and teacheth them to hate virtue at the same time that they teach them to know it.
John Tillotson: Sermons.    
  5
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors